Dogs and Vaccines

New science comes out all the time concerning our dog’s health.  This information can be life altering to you and your dog.

At the top of the list now, is “Vaccines”.  What vaccines are necessary, at what age should they be given and which ones potentially could harm our dogs.

Vaccines are necessary because many diseases are life threatening, but…some of these very same vaccines are now known to cause other problems.  Problems like; joint and hip dysplasia, aggression, lymphoma-yes lymphoma ( a death sentence for your dog. )

Here at White Oak Golden Retrievers we believe in limited vaccines, holistic vet care and of course, a species appropriate diet.

There are many sources that you can research to get the most up to date information on what vaccines to give, when to give them, and which ones can wait.

Visit our website; http://www.whiteoakgoldenretrievers.com and then click on our “health and diet” page to start your research.  We hope you will join us in our quest to keep our dogs living longer and free of disease.

White Oak Golden Retrievers

http://www.whiteoakgoldenretrievers.com

Rabies and Cancer

Rabies and Cancer:

A very interesting article on rabies and cancer in dogs.

http://www.thedogplace.org/VACCINES/Vaccine-reaction-essay-tumor-photos-P.Jordan-DVM-136158.asp

White Oak Golden Retrievers

http://www.whiteoakgoldenretrievers.com

 

Dog Poisoning

By Dr. Becker

Arsenic is a heavy metal mineral. Inorganic arsenic is often found in products like herbicides, insecticides, wood preservatives, and some types of insulation. Organic arsenic is used in certain drugs to treat or prevent blood parasites, including heartworm.

How Pets Become Poisoned by Arsenic

In most cases of arsenic poisoning, a pet inadvertently ingests a product containing arsenic that is lying around. However, sometimes toxicity occurs over a long period of time, such as when a dog or cat eats grass that is regularly treated with herbicides containing arsenic.

Arsenic that dissolves in water is quickly absorbed after your pet swallows it. Most of the arsenic that is ingested binds to red blood cells and is distributed to body tissues, with the highest levels accumulating in the liver, kidneys, heart, and lungs. In cases of long-term exposure, arsenic accumulates in the skin, nails, sweat glands, and fur.

It’s typically the GI tract, liver, kidneys, lungs, blood vessels, and skin that are most vulnerable to arsenic damage.

Symptoms of Arsenic Poisoning

Symptoms of arsenic poisoning in a pet usually come on suddenly, within a few hours of ingestion, and are quite severe. In some cases, it can take up to 24 hours for symptoms to develop.

Because the GI and cardiovascular systems are affected, blood loss and shock may occur. There is often watery diarrhea that may be tinged with blood, severe colic, dehydration, weakness, staggering, depression, a weak pulse, and loss of consciousness. Circulatory collapse is also possible.

Symptoms can continue for hours or even weeks, depending on the amount of arsenic ingested. In very severe cases, death can be almost immediate.

Diagnosing Arsenic Poisoning

Since your veterinarian or the emergency animal clinic will need to know what your pet has ingested, if you suspect your dog or cat is suffering from arsenic toxicity, it’s important to try and bring the suspect product with you.

Unfortunately, most people don’t see their pet ingest arsenic. But if your dog or cat is experiencing vomiting or diarrhea, bringing a sample with you to the veterinary clinic can help speed up the diagnostic process.

The vet will need to know when your pet’s symptoms started and incidents that could have resulted in a poisoning. There again, if you have products containing arsenic in your house, bring them with you to the vet’s office.

A complete blood count (CBC), a chemical blood profile, and a urinalysis will be performed, and a sample of your pet’s stomach contents may also be collected. Arsenic found in the bloodstream or stomach contents confirms the diagnosis of arsenic toxicity.

If the poisoning is chronic (long-term), the level of arsenic in your pet’s body can be determined by a hair sample.

Treatment Options

The goal of treatment in cases of arsenic toxicity is to flush the substance out of your pet’s body. If the arsenic was recently ingested, vomiting should be induced to expel as much of the poison as possible. If you actually see your pet consuming the poison, it’s important to quickly induce vomiting. I recommend you call your vet or your local emergency clinic for instructions on how to do this safely.

Inducing vomiting can be dangerous under certain circumstances, so don’t do it unless you’re absolutely sure your pet has swallowed arsenic or another toxic substance. If your pet has already vomited, don’t try to induce vomiting or to encourage more of it. Remember that vomiting should never be induced in a dog or cat that is unconscious, having problems breathing, or is showing signs of serious distress or shock.

If you don’t know when your pet swallowed the poison, he needs to be seen by a veterinarian right away. Your vet or the emergency clinic staff will perform a gastric lavage (irrigation of the stomach) to flush out the stomach contents, followed by doses of activated charcoal and a medication that will help the bowels to empty. Your pet will probably also be given medicines to prevent damage to the GI tract.

Certain compounds are known to chelate (bind) heavy metals like arsenic, so your pet will probably be given those as well. Many animals suffering from arsenic poisoning need to be hospitalized for a few days until their condition stabilizes. Intravenous (IV) fluids, blood transfusions, and dimercaprol (an antidote to arsenic) will be given as needed while your pet is in the hospital.

Since arsenic severely damages the liver and kidneys, kidney and liver function will be monitored during treatment. Pets with kidney failure will continue on fluid therapy.

Arsenic poisoning in pets is a medical emergency. Unfortunately, in severe cases, very few patients survive unless treatment is started very early, before symptoms progress.

This article was published by Dr. Karen Becker; a holistic veterinarian.  See other great articles that Dr. Becker has written at; http://www.mercola.com.

White Oak Golden Retrievers

http://www.whiteoakgoldenretrievers.com

Rabies in Dogs

Why Challenge Current Rabies Vaccine Policy?

Rabies vaccination is required by law in nearly all areas. Even though protection from rabies is documented to last at least three years, current law in some states or areas still requires that boosters be given annually or biannually rather than the standard policy of every three years. However, vaccination against rabies virus is occasionally associated with debilitating adverse effects. According to the CDC domestic animals account for less than 10% of the reported rabies cases, with cats, cattle, and dogs most often reported rabid. Scientific data indicate that vaccinating dogs against rabies every three years, as most states require, is unnecessary.

Studies have shown the duration of protective immunity as measured by serum antibody titers against rabies virus to persist for seven years post-vaccination. By validating the ‘true’ life of rabies virus immunity and moving to five and hopefully seven years, we will decrease the risk of adverse reactions in our animals and minimize their repeated exposure to foreign substances. Killed vaccines like those for rabies virus can trigger both immediate and delayed adverse vaccine reactions (termed “vaccinosis”). While there may be immediate hypersensitivity reactions, other acute events tend to occur 24-72 hours afterwards, or up to 45 days later in the case of delayed reactions.

Reactions that have been documented include:

  • Behavior changes such as aggression and separation anxiety
  • Obsessive behavior,self-mutilation, tail chewing
  • Pica – eating wood, stones, earth, stool
  • Destructive behavior, shredding bedding
  • Seizures, epilepsy
  • Fibrosarcomas at injection site
  • Autoimmune diseases such as those affecting bone marrow and blood cells, joints, eyes, skin, kidney, liver, bowel and central nervous system
  • Muscular weakness and or atrophy
  • Chronic digestive problems

The Rabies Challenge Fund

Rabies Exemptions and Waivers
Rabies Vaccination is required by law. In some instances, it is possible to secure a written waiver for exemption from rabies booster vaccination. A letter justifying the medical reason for such exemption needs to be obtained from your primary care veterinarian. When seeking a waiver, a rabies serum antibody titer should be performed. Adequate serum rabies titers are at least 1:5 by the RFFIT method. Waiver requests are not generally accepted based on serum antibody titers alone, but may be granted on a case-by-case basis with justification. Waivers are not granted as a matter of personal preference, and localities often do not permit waivers and exemptions regardless of the justification.

This article comes from the Rabies Challenge Fund.  They are an organization that does what they say they will do.  They are currently working on changing the law from rabies being given every three years to every seven years.  Please donate anything you can to help this organization achieve this goal.  Our dogs lives depend on it.  Go to:  http://www.rabieschallengefund.org to make a donation.

White Oak Golden Retrievers

http://www.whiteoakgoldenretrievers.com

Pet Poisoning-Act Quick

This very important article by Dr. Karen Becker, a leading holistic veterinarian, stresses that acting quickly if you suspect your pet has ingested something will determine their survival rate.  Any change in your dog’s behavior can signal poisoning.

Pet Poisoning-Act Quick

By Dr. Becker

In 2013, the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) processed nearly 180,000 cases of pets potentially exposed to toxic substances.

The APCC has compiled a list of five important tips for handling a pet poisoning emergency in your own household.

5 Quick Tips for Dealing with a Pet Poisoning Emergency

  1. Be Ready

    Before you ever need them, make sure your veterinarian’s phone number, the number of the closest emergency veterinary hospital, and the number for a pet poison center are saved in your phone. The APCC number is 888-426-4435; the Pet Poison Hotline is 800-213-6680.

    And remember that you may be able to provide important, even life-saving initial treatment at home if you have a pet first aid kit ready and easily accessible in an emergency.

  2. Keep Your Cool

    Maintaining your composure when faced with a pet emergency can be hard to do, but it’s really important if you want to insure your furry family member gets the help he needs. If you stay calm, you’ll be better able to provide first aid, as well as vital information to the people treating your pet.

  3. Evaluate Your Pet’s Condition

    It’s important to make a clear-eyed observation of your pet’s condition. Is she behaving abnormally? Is she bleeding? Is she having trouble breathing? Is she having convulsions or seizures? Is she unresponsive? If you answer “yes” to any of these questions, your pet needs immediate medical attention. Call your vet or the nearest emergency animal hospital and alert them that you’re on your way.

  4. Be Prepared to Answer Questions

    What is the toxic substance you know or suspect your pet ingested? Either pack up the substance itself (this is ideal), or write down the exact name of the product or medication. You’ll also want to write down the strength (typically in milligrams) of the drug, the concentration of active ingredients in herbicides or pesticides and the EPA registration number, and any other information you think might help the veterinarian who will be treating your pet.

    When did the poisoning happen? Did you catch your pet actually ingesting the substance? Has your pet vomited? If so, did she vomit up any of the poison or packaging?

  5. Be Proactive

    If you know or suspect your pet has ingested a poison, don’t wait for symptoms before seeking help. Time is of the essence in preventing the poison from being absorbed by your pet’s body. The faster you are able to treat your furry companion at home (with guidance from your vet or a pet poison hotline), or get her to a veterinarian, the better her chances for survival and a full recovery.

    by Dr. Karen Becker

    White Oak Golden Retrievers

    http://www.whiteoakgoldenretrievers.com

Probiotics for Dogs and Cats

Probiotics: The One Supplement Every Pet Should Be Taking

October 26, 2010

The use of probiotics in mainstream veterinary practices is on the upswing.

Veterinarians are starting to use beneficial bacteria not only to treat their patients with gastrointestinal disorders, but also as immune system support for puppies, kittens and aging pets.

According to Amy Dicke, technical services veterinarian for P&G Pet Care:

“Sixty to 80 percent of the body’s immune system lies in the digestive tract. This means the GI function has influence on the immune system and how it reacts. A healthy GI tract will help an animal fight disease, so keeping this balance of healthy bacteria alive is an important part of overall wellness.”

“Research isn’t readily available to support every potential use of probiotics in animals, but veterinarians should remain open to benefits outside of a diarrhea remedy,” says Susan Wynn, DVM, of Georgia Veterinary Specialists. “Clients will continue to demand probiotics and the industry will continue to find ways to use them.”

Dr. Becker’s Comments:

As you’re aware if you read the full article at the link, mainstream veterinarians and major pet food manufacturers are getting into the probiotics business in a big way.

That’s both good and bad news, from my perspective.

Probiotic Profiteers

I’m happy to see more attention paid to the enormous benefits probiotics can provide to the health and well-being of companion animals.

However, I’m concerned pet food companies will use the growing interest in probiotics by pet owners and veterinarians to create food formulas containing substandard, essentially useless probiotic additives. Then, of course, their marketing people will get busy positioning these ‘new-and-improved’ formulas in such a way that consumers will believe they are providing high quality probiotics conveniently contained in the food they serve their dog or cat.

It’s troubling to know that some of the very pet food giants responsible for the poorest quality diets available – formulas that have largely contributed to the compromised health of millions of companion animals — are the same ones now leading the industry’s charge to get probiotics-related pet products to market.

A Short Primer on Probiotics

Probiotics are ‘friendly’ strains of bacteria that maintain healthy levels of good bacteria in your pet’s GI tract, and also defend against opportunistic, potentially pathogenic (bad) bacteria.

The digestive tract is the largest immune organ in your pet’s body, and yours. Believe it or not, your dog or cat has even more intestinal bacteria than you do, despite her much smaller size. The GI tracts of companion animals are designed to handle a tremendous bacterial load – bacteria that would quite likely develop into a life-threatening infection if found elsewhere in your dog’s or cat’s body.

A healthy population of friendly bacteria keeps your pet’s immune system in good working order. If the balance of bad-to-good intestinal bugs gets out of whack, your dog or cat will eventually develop GI symptoms and an increased susceptibility to illness.

Studies demonstrate animals raised without friendly bacteria in the gut, or with a poor balance of good-to-bad gut bacteria, are at dramatically increased risk of developing disease.

Why a Healthy Balance of Gut Bacteria is Important

When your dog’s or cat’s gastrointestinal bacteria are in balance with the right amount and type of healthy bugs on board, there is symbiosis. Good things happen inside your pet’s body. For example:

  • Vitamins are made
  • Vegetable fiber is processed as it should be
  • Unfriendly bacteria are kept in check
  • Toxins are well-managed

When unfriendly, pathogenic bacteria take over your pet’s digestive system, it creates dysbiosis, which is more or less the opposite of symbiosis.

Dysbiosis results in increased permeability – leakiness — of the intestinal wall, which means your pet’s GI tract will be less able to allow healthy bacteria and nutrients in and keep disease-causing bacteria out.

A healthy GI tract is selective about what is absorbed. Nutrients are taken in and non-nutritive substances, including toxins, are filtered out.

Exciting Recent Study Results

Back to the good news-bad news department — up until major pet food manufacturers took an interest in probiotics, there was very little research into the ways in which supplementation could improve the health of dogs and cats.

Now that pet food companies have discovered a lucrative market in probiotic products, it’s a very safe bet much more funding for research will be made available.

Study results will benefit pet food producers, of course, but they will also help veterinarians, pet owners and others concerned with the health of dogs and cats learn more about the uses and promise of probiotic supplementation.

A few examples of recent research:

They also maintained their vaccination titers longer and had higher levels of fecal secretory IgA, an important antibody produced in the lining of the intestine that protects against bacteria and viruses. The higher fecal IgA result was also seen in elderly dogs fed E. faecium, as well as kittens. Kittens and adult cats showed decreased incidence and duration of naturally occurring diarrhea and improved good-to-bad gut bacteria ratios.

  • In another study of the benefits of E. faecium involving 11 healthy dogs, not only was their fecal microflora improved, but so were serum lipids. Eight of the 11 dogs given the probiotic supplement showed a decrease in total lipids and normalized cholesterol levels.
  • In a study of the effects of strain L. acidophilus on healthy adult cats, the probiotic altered the balance of GI microflora and in addition, resulted in beneficial systemic and immunomodulatory effects.
  • In this study, conducted by a veterinarian to test a pet probiotic manufacturer’s claims of help for cats with renal failure, results showed the supplement decreased creatinine levels in six of seven cats and improved their health and vitality. This probiotic contained a mixture of three strains: Streptococus thermophilus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Bifidobacterium longum.

The Pet Probiotic I Use and Recommend

Two things I don’t recommend are 1) using human probiotics on dogs and cats, and 2) using processed pet foods with probiotic additives.

Probiotic formulas used by humans were developed specifically to fortify the bacterial species found in the human GI tract. Pets have specific strains of bacteria unique to them, so they need a unique probiotic. Your dog or cat must have organisms derived from its own species for best results. You probably won’t harm your pet by offering human probiotics, but you aren’t providing as much benefit as you would be by offering a species-appropriate product.

The bacteria in a probiotic must be live and able to reproduce in order for it to be beneficial. Tests on dog foods claiming to contain probiotic micro-organisms showed the manufacturing process kills too many of the live bacteria, rendering the probiotic effect useless by the time the food is packaged and shipped.

A pet probiotic should have the following qualities:

  • It must not cause disease (despite the fact it contains bacteria)
  • It must survive the acidic environment of your pet’s stomach
  • It must contain enough live organisms to colonize the intestines
  • It must contain the correct strains of bacteria beneficial for pets, not people
  • It should remain stable under normal storage conditions
  • It should be easy to give to your dog or cat

A Great Article by Mercola.com.  Please go to http://www.healthypets.com to order your probiotic specially formulated for dogs and puppies.  Giving your puppy or dog yogurt is not enough probiotic to be of benefit for your pets.  We introduce a probiotic to our puppies at 3 weeks of age when they start to eat.  It has helped our puppies immune system from the start and has cut down greatly on loose stools and diarrhea.

White Oak Golden Retrievers

http://www.whiteoakgoldenretrievers.com

Garlic for Dogs: Poison or Medicine

Garlic For Dogs: Poison Or Medicine?

Yes, I promote the use of garlic. Fresh, aromatic, organic garlic with a smell that lingers in the kitchen promising either a good meal or a good heal.So why do I go against AVMA warnings and give garlic to my dogs? I do it because common sense and an objective look at both the risks and benefits of garlic tell me it can provide great benefits to dogs with minimal risk. Remember, AMVA (American Medical Veterinary Association) members also think that raw food is unhealthy and would rather dogs eat a processed, chemical laden diet than fresh, raw free-range chicken or vitamin packed green tripe.

Why the controversy over garlic?

The primary reason AVMA is against feeding garlic is that it contains thiosulphate, which can cause hemolytic anemia, liver damage and death. However garlic only contains very small traces of thiosulphate and a dog would have to consume a huge quantity for any negative effects. Using Tylenol (acetaminophen) or benzocaine topical ointments to stop itching are far more likely to cause anemia in dogs.

Garlic’s medicinal properties

There are many health benefits to feeding garlic. Here are some things you might not know about this healthy herb:

  • Garlic is a natural antibiotic and won’t affect the good bacteria in the gut which are needed for digestion and immune health
  • Garlic is antifungal
  • Garlic is antiviral
  • Garlic boosts the immune system
  • Garlic makes dogs less desirable to fleas
  • Garlic is antiparasitic

What kind of garlic?

I stick with fresh, raw organic garlic and keep it on hand as a staple for both cooking and healing. If it’s fresh, I know the medicinal qualities are still there, unlike minced garlic which may originate in China and sit for months in a jar. Powdered garlic doesn’t cut it either. Kyolic Aged Liquid Garlic is a good choice if you don’t want to smash and cut every day.

How much garlic to feed

You can safely give a 1/2 clove per ten pounds of body weight each day, chopped or grated. Two cloves maximum per day for a large dog is a good guideline.

  • ½ clove for a 10 + pounds
  • 1 clove for a 20 + pounds
  • 1 ½ cloves for 30 + pounds
  • 2 cloves for 40 + pounds

My dogs are over 70 pounds but I stick with the 2 cloves.

Garlic tips

For optimum health benefits, let garlic sit for 5 to 10 minutes after cutting and before serving (or cooking). This allows the health-promoting allicin to form, so it’s worth the wait.

To get rid of the smell on your hands, rinse them under water while rubbing them with a stainless steel spoon! I don’t know why it works, but bless the woman who told me this long ago.

A great home remedy recipe

An ear medicine I’ve kept on hand for years started out when my kids got ‘swimmers ear’ one summer. It’s simple to make and since garlic is an antibiotic, antibacterial, and antifungal it covers several possibilities.

Crush 2 cloves fresh garlic; wait ten minutes and add them to 1/3 cup olive oil. Heat in a pan (do NOT boil) for several minutes. Let cool. Strain and store in a glass bottle with a dropper and apply it directly in the ears.

The only possible drawback to this remedy is every time I smell it I want pasta and garlic bread!

Another great article from Dogs Naturally Magazine.  Get this great magazine today.  Keeping your Dog Healthy.

White Oak Golden Retrievers

http://www.whiteoakgoldenretrievers.com

Ear Infections in Dogs – A Holistic Way to Treat Ear Infections

Making a Mullein Mix

For an easy-to-make-at-home preparation for mild infections, you can make a mullein mix as follows:

Pack mullein leaves and flowers in a glass jar and cover with olive oil. For increased antibiotic effectiveness, you can add a clove or two of garlic per pint of oil. Let the mixture sit for two to three weeks. Strain and apply several drops of the warmed oil into the ear canal.

Please note that the key to curing external ear infections is getting the herbal mixture into contact with the offending bugs. Have your veterinarian show you how to properly apply vinegar or herbal solutions so that they reach deep into the ear canal. And remember, as always, it’s much easier to prevent infection than to cure it. For prevention, I recommend using a mild herbal ear remedy once a month or so throughout your pet’s lifetime, both internally and topically into the ear canal. For infections, the duration of use can vary on a case-by-case basis from once or twice daily for a few weeks to once a week for several months.

Chamomile (Matricaria recutita) has relaxing, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, sedative, and antiseptic qualities and is perfect for soothing sore ears. Taken internally, it has a powerful ability to calm your pet and help her sleep through the pain.

St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum) has antibiotic properties and is wonderful, both internally and externally, for calming your pet during an infection.

Calendula (Calendula officinalis) has an amazing healing ability and is one of the best herbs for treating local skin and external ear problems. Used either internally or externally, it is a potent antifungal herb.

Mullein (Verbascum spp.), extracted in olive oil as directed above, is perhaps the best single remedy I’ve found for soothing and healing inflamed surfaces. For otitis, use the solution externally in the ear canal.

Garlic (Allium sativum) is often added to otitic herbal mixtures for its antibiotic properties.

Witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana) is an excellent astringent that decreases swelling in the ear canal and eases pain.

To balance the immune system and help counterattack the microbes from the inside out, I typically recommend a combination of echinacea (Echinacea spp.) and Oregon grape root (Mahonia aquifolium), given as a tea, tincture, or capsules/tablets. Read the label and adjust the dosage for the weight of the animal based on a human weight of 150 pounds.

The good news is that herbal remedies are effective against fungal, yeast, and bacterial infections. So herbal ear-infection remedies won’t allow the yeast overgrowth common with antibiotic use. What’s more, several of the above herbs (chamomile, mullein flowers, and witch hazel) relieve the pain, inflammation, and irritation common with ear problems. This means that when you’re using herbs, you almost never need to resort to ear medicines that contain steroids.

However, herbal remedies are not the magic bullet for all external ear infections. Remember that herbs tend to act slowly. While your pet’s ears are healing, you may want to give them soothing herbs such as valerian (Valeriana officinalis) or chamomile internally to keep them calm. It’s been my experience that the herbal remedies work nearly as fast as other veterinary drugs, and whatever we lose in quickness of response we get back with a more completely healed ear at the end of the therapy.

Interested in learning more about natural treatment options for your dog? Then you’ll want to be a part of the NCHS! Dr Randy Kidd DVM PHD and other great presenters will give you their top veterinary secrets and  tips at the Natural Canine Health Symposium.

Another great article on holistic treatment for ear infections in dogs from Dogs Naturally Magazine. 

This article was written by Randy Kidd, DVM PHD in Holistic Care. 

White Oak Golden Retrievers

http://www.whiteoakgoldenretrievers.com

 

 

 

 


 

Lyme Disease-A Holistic Approach

A Homeopathic Protocol for Lyme Disease

 

tick infested small

If you live in a Lyme disease endemic area such as the Northeast and upper Midwest and your dog is the outdoorsy type who picks up ticks on his adventures, you can use homeopathy to good effect in protecting him against Lyme disease.

Joette Calabrese, HMC, CCH, RSHom(NA) is a distinguished American homeopath, public speaker and author. Find her at joettecalabrese.com. Joette’s family lives in the country, with plenty of deer and other critters nearby. The surrounding woods are considered a Lyme tick Mecca. She’s successfully used the protocol described below for many years on Buster (described as “the bad office dog”) as well as her human family members.

This protocol is not for long-term, chronic Lyme disease; for that you’ll need to seek the expertise of a seasoned veterinary homeopath.

First, the tick

When you find a tick on your dog, the first thing to do is remove the tick as soon as possible. There are several techniques you can use; read about them here.

ticks

Save the tick by placing it in a covered jar with either 180 proof vodka, grain alcohol or brandy and label it with the date, on whom it was found and where on the body. In the unlikely event that all else fails, the tick can be made into a homeopathic remedy. This is known as isopathy, which works under principles similar to homeopathy.

But for now, just keep the tick in a jar.

Then follow whichever steps below are appropriate for your dog’s situation, depending on how long ago the bite occurred and whether he is displaying any symptoms of Lyme disease.

 

Step 1 – for prevention after a recent bite

This has been found to be highly effective for bites that are rather recent – say within a few weeks.

Remedy: Ledum palustre 200C

Ledum is the foremost remedy for any kind of animal bite.

  • Give the first dose of this remedy at the time you remove the tick.
  • Continue dosing with Ledum every 3 hours for the first day
  • Then, dose twice daily for a week
  • After the first week, dose twice weekly for a month
  • Then once per week for another month

This is probably overkill, but worth the extra effort to be certain.

If the tick was discovered in the last few days, Step 1 is likely all you’ll need.

But if your dog has been diagnosed with Lyme disease that is older and more entrenched, follow Step 1 as above, then add Step 2 at any time after using Ledum.

Step 2 – in the event of a Lyme diagnosis

Remedy: Aurum arsenicum 200C 

Aurum arsenicum is a capital choice for when a poisonous infection arises, and this is one of those times.

  • Dose twice daily for one week
  • After the first week, dose twice weekly for a month
  • Then once per week for another month

For older cases in which it is critical to take all precautions because illness has set in, follow Step 3 along with the previous remedies.

 Step 3 – when there are clinical symptoms of Lyme

Remedy: Borrelia burgdorferi 30C (also called Lyme Nosode 30C)

Borrelia is the remedy made from the Lyme tick.

  • Dose with Borrelia once per day for three days and then stop, for a total of three doses
  • This may need to be repeated every few months if the symptoms remain.

Symptoms

In older cases of Lyme, the most common symptoms in dogs are arthritis or painful joints and lameness; other symptoms may include fever, lack of appetite, depression or lethargy. Dogs do not exhibit the classic “bulls eye” rash that occurs in humans. Symptoms can occur two to five months after exposure. If your dog shows these symptoms, it’s best to consult an experienced homeopathic vet who can prescribe the correct remedy for his symptoms, along with the above procedures.

How effective is this protocol?

When Step 1 is used at the right time, it’s rare that Lyme disease will develop.

In older cases, where there is a Lyme diagnosis or symptoms, success can frequently be achieved, but may be affected by how entrenched the disease is, whether (and how often) antibiotics and other allopathic drugs have been employed, as well as the general vital force of the dog.

Joette Calabrese has generously shared this protocol and asks that if you know someone who should have this information, please pass it along. Spread the good news of how homeopathy can help!

Aritcle from Dog’s Natually Magazine

So many of our dog owners are concerned and worried about Lyme Disease.  This article gives some answers and alternatives for this mounting problem.  White Oak Golden Retrievers

http://www.whiteoakgoldenretrievers.com

Error Found in University Pet Food Study

Oops! Big Error Found in University Pet Food Study

You might recall a study released by UC Davis last year claiming most home prepared diets fail to provide all the nutrients a dog needs. Warnings were all over the news advising consumers to ONLY feed their pet a meal balanced by a board certified nutritionist (otherwise known as commercial pet food) – based on this ‘study’. Well…as it turns out, the study appears to have a significant error (…I believe more than one).

The UC Davis press release on the study that bashed home cooking for pets stated:

“Some owners prefer to prepare their dogs’ food at home because they feel they have better control over the animals’ diet, want to provide a more natural food or simply don’t trust pet food companies,” said Jennifer Larsen, an assistant professor of clinical nutrition at the William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at UC Davis and lead author on the study.

“The results of this study, however, indicate that most available recipes for healthy dogs, even those published in books by veterinarians, do not provide essential nutrients in the quantities required by the dog,” Larsen said. “It is extremely difficult for the average pet owner – or even veterinarians – to come up with balanced recipes to create appropriate meals that are safe for long-term use,” she said.”

The UC Davis study analyzed 200 recipes from 34 different sources including veterinary textbooks, pet care books and web sites. They evaluated the recipes using a computer-based program to “quantify the nutritional content” of each recipe. And found only nine recipes of the 200 met “the minimum standards established for adult dogs by the Association of American Feed Control Officials” (AAFCO).

Sounds concerning doesn’t it? And the results from the UC Davis study almost seems like it’s impossible to properly feed our pets from home.

But…

The computer based program used to analyze the nutritional content of pet food recipes was from a company co-owned by none other than Dr. Larsen (of UC Davis – one of the authors of the study).

Further, it needs to be noted that the UC Davis/Dr. Larsen study was comparing apples to oranges…times ten. As was stated in the press release, the UC Davis study was comparing the nutritional standards for dogs to the nutrition dogs consume when eating real food (from home prepared recipes). The problem (and a significant problem it is) is that the nutritional standards for dogs (and cats) are based on the nutrition provided by common commercial pet food ingredients such as chicken meal, or by-product meal or added supplements. Nutritional standards are not based on the nutrition provided by whole foods – actual human grade chicken and vegetables purchased from your local grocery store. So this study tried to compare apples (real food) to oranges (commercial pet food ingredients like powdered chicken meal with added supplements). It can’t be done. There is no comparison to a roasted chicken you cook in your oven to the powdered chicken meal used in many pet foods. They are both ‘chicken’ but the comparison stops there. The scientists that performed this study should have known better than to try to compare the two.

However, to explain the biggest ‘but’ to this UC Davis study, we need one more quote from the press release (bold added):

“Some of the deficiencies, particularly those related to choline, vitamin D, zinc and vitamin E, could result in significant health problems such as immune dysfunction, accumulation of fat in the liver and musculoskeletal abnormalities,” Larsen said.”

The UC Davis study stated the National Research Council recommends “339 IU” of Vitamin D (per 1,000 kcal) for adult dogs. This is incorrect. The 2006 National Research Council publication actually recommends “136 IU” of Vitamin D (per 1,000 kcal) for adult dogs.

UC Davis study:    339.0 IU of Vitamin D per 1,000 kcal
NRC recommendation:        136.0 IU of Vitamin D per 1,000 kcal

The UC Davis study bashed home prepared meals for pets…compared recipes to a hugely escalated nutrient (vitamin D)…and they made it sound like these recipes were so deficient, harm could be caused to the pets that ate these foods. The study intentionally swayed consumers away from home prepared pet foods. When actually, should any of the recipes examined in the study have met the escalated, falsely quoted NRC recommendation of 339 IU of Vitamin D…that’s when the pet could have actually been harmed. The real “significant health problem” is that a university published, peer reviewed study made a 250% error in nutrient comparison.

(The UC Davis study was published in the June 2013 Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. Copies of that study can be acquired here: http://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/full/10.2460/javma.242.11.1500.  The 2006 National Research Council nutrient requirements of Cats and Dogs can be acquired here: http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=10668).

Now why would a major university disparage home prepared pet food? Why would a major university disparage the work of over 120 other veterinarians (formulators of the recipes the study bashed)?

DrLarsonThis is a picture taken from the UC Davis website – of Dr. Larsen.

Those cans of pet food in the dispenser next to Dr. Larsen…they are Science Diet. In the video of this Fox News story about the UC Davis/Dr. Larsen study you also notice canisters of kibble. If you look quickly you’ll see the names Purina and Royal Canin on the canisters.

 

Three guesses – first two don’t count – as to why a study published by veterinary nutritionists from a major university told consumers NOT to feed their pets real food. We all know why don’t we?

The following questions were sent to Dr. Larsen (a response email stated she would be out of the office until June 30, 2014)…

 

Hi Dr. Larsen,
I’m writing asking for a statement from you regarding the peer reviewed study you published last year finding home prepared diets provided insufficient nutrition to dogs.

I understand your study was published using incorrect variables for Vitamin D; significantly incorrect. I am publishing a story on this significant error in your study – that was not caught by the peer review. If you would like to provide a statement regarding the error, please provide this right away.

Also, if you would like to address a few other questions that I will mention in my story, I will be glad to provide your side of the story. Those questions are…

Will you/UC Davis be issuing an apology to all pet food consumers and veterinarians regarding this error?
Will you/UC Davis be providing the names of those that reviewed the study (those that also missed the significant Vitamin D error)?
Will you/UC Davis be releasing your raw data to this study to verify that other variables used to compare nutrient information of home prepared recipes were as insufficient as your study claimed? (You must realize that this significant error with Vitamin D does bring doubt to everything else in the study and all involved.)
Was funding for this now flawed study provided by any of Big Pet Food or their trade associations? Will you be providing full disclosure of who funded this study?

Because you compared whole food recipes – recipes using meats and vegetables sourced from USDA inspected and approved for human consumption foods – to the nutritional requirements of dogs eating mostly kibble (highly processed) made from meats and vegetables sourced from ‘feed grade’ ingredients (including 4D meats, pesticide or chemical laden rejected for use in human food vegetables) – wasn’t your study trying to compare organic apples to 3rd generation genetically engineered oranges? The 2006 NRC Nutrient requirements of cats and dogs was funded in part by The Pet Food Institute (PFI) – the trade organization for Big Pet Food. This funding provided the PFI significant perks to influence the outcome of the NRC research (source: http://www.nationalacademies.org/xpedio/groups/nasite/documents/webpage/na_069619.pdf). As well, the 2006 NRC research was determined based on “utilization of nutrients in ingredients commonly produced and commercially available”.

Common ingredients such as genetically modified grains and rendered meat meals including those sourced from 4D animals (dead, diseased, dying, and disabled). Again – and your response to this question is requested – wasn’t your study trying to compare whole food nutrition using certified human grade ingredients in lightly processed recipes to nutrients from ingredients that are commonly produced and commercially available found in highly processed foods such as kibble? Comparing organic apples to 3rd generation genetically modified oranges?

Your timely response to these questions will be appreciated.

Susan Thixton

 

Should Dr. Larsen or UC Davis respond to these questions, they will be published.

For decades, commercial pet food came only in two forms – kibble and canned – and was sourced from feed grade (waste) ingredients. As pet food has changed – mostly due to consumer demand – regulatory authorities and mainstream academia has held onto the past. Most stubbornly refusing to accept the fact that real food is healthier for our pets than feed grade waste processed into kibble or can pet food.

What a shame.

I’m not going back to feeding my pets waste ingredient pet food…are any of you?

UC Davis, Dr. Larsen, and all involved in this study (including the peers who reviewed the study) owe pet food consumers an apology. While we wait for that apology, I hope all that were involved in this study (and all those that were behind this study) open your minds to the fact that pet food has changed. Not all pet food comes from waste ingredients and in the form of a kibble or can. While there might always be some that feel waste ingredient pet foods are sufficient to feed their pets, a growing majority of pet food consumers have witnessed first hand the health benefits real food has been to our pets. They will never go back to waste ‘feed’ pet food.

 

Addition (added 6/29/14): The following message was received from Dr. Michael Fox (holistic veterinarian known probably all over the world from his syndicated newspaper column and books) – Honor Roll Member of the AVMA…

Hi Susan, FYI: I immediately wrote to Dr. Larsen at UVC Davis after I read the JAVMA article bashing home-prepared recipes for dogs & cats, since she referenced mine from my website www.drfoxvet.com. I said that I would very much appreciate a copy of her analyses of my formulations and if there were any deficiencies or imbalances from her perspective.

I never received a reply.

 

 

Wishing you and your pet(s) the best,

Susan Thixton
Pet Food Safety Advocate
Author Buyer Beware, Co-Author Dinner PAWsible
TruthaboutPetFood.com
Association for Truth in Pet Food

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