Archive for the ‘dog stories’ Category

Dogs and Vaccines

New science comes out all the time concerning our dog’s health.  This information can be life altering to you and your dog.

At the top of the list now, is “Vaccines”.  What vaccines are necessary, at what age should they be given and which ones potentially could harm our dogs.

Vaccines are necessary because many diseases are life threatening, but…some of these very same vaccines are now known to cause other problems.  Problems like; joint and hip dysplasia, aggression, lymphoma-yes lymphoma ( a death sentence for your dog. )

Here at White Oak Golden Retrievers we believe in limited vaccines, holistic vet care and of course, a species appropriate diet.

There are many sources that you can research to get the most up to date information on what vaccines to give, when to give them, and which ones can wait.

Visit our website; http://www.whiteoakgoldenretrievers.com and then click on our “health and diet” page to start your research.  We hope you will join us in our quest to keep our dogs living longer and free of disease.

White Oak Golden Retrievers

http://www.whiteoakgoldenretrievers.com

Advertisements

Infographic: The Benefits of Massage – Life Dog – Web 2012 – Life Dog

Infographic: The Benefits of Massage – Life Dog – Web 2012 – Life Dog.

Avoiding Pet Foods Made in China

Think You Can Avoid Pet Foods Made In China?  Think Again!

Written by Dogs Naturally Magazine on February 23, 2012. Posted in In The News, Nutrition And Diet 32 Comments

 
 

Hundreds of consumer complaints are aimed at dog food manufactures so far in 2012 and dozens – perhaps hundreds – of dogs are dead.  Does this sound like deja vu?  Could there be another massive recall like there was five years ago?  The answer is, it is likely happening now.

Fortunately, pet owners have become wiser since the melamine poisonings and massive recalls from 2007 and many are making decisions that will protect their pets.  They have learned that quality control and food safety standards are shabby at best in many overseas and Chinese manufacturing plants and that even in the US, manufacturers have few safety and testing requirements.  Pet owners are wisely avoiding treats and foods made in China and that’s good.  But despite avoiding these products, their dogs continue to die and become ill.  How can this happen when the food label says ‘made in the USA’?

The tip of the iceberg

The label on your pet food or treat may conceal a little lie – and this lie could cost your pet his health or even his life.  There is something inherently wrong with most processed foods that pet owners are unaware of.  The heating and processing that these foods undergo create a fundamental change that could have dangerous ramifications – it renders the food essentially dead.  What goes into the good is not what comes out once it is heated, sterilized, irradiated and extruded and nearly all dog foods will not meet AAFCO standards once they are heated.  As a consequence, the vitamins and minerals must be added back in for the food to pass AAFCO requirements.

Enter the premix

dog food labelBack in 2007, the melamine that was poisoning dogs and cats was not added directly to the pet foods – it was found in the premix.  The Chinese manufacturers added it to their premix to boost the protein content as cheaply as possible.  Only when dogs and cats started dying – and the FDA was forced to begin testing the foods – did anyone become aware of the fact.  What made the recall so large was that it wasn’t limited to a single food manufacturer.  Because they nearly all must rely on premixes, a large number of pet food manufacturers that purchased the same premix were affected.  What this means is that switching your pet from one food to another doesn’t necessarily mean you have made any difference at all if your new food purchases the same premix.

How do you know if your food contains premix?  Look at the label.  On the right is a label from what many people consider a high-end kibble.   See those vitamins, minerals and long chemical names that are listed at the bottom?  Those very likely came from a premix and that premix was very likely manufactured overseas.  If the premix is not added to the food, your dog would become ill and under-nourished from eating the nutritionally dead contents.  If the premix is added to the food, you are relying on foreign safety standards and are essentially playing roulette with your dog’s or your cat’s health.

Compare that label to the ingredients of a quality, commercial food:  Lamb meat, lamb bone, lamb blood, eggs, lamb green tripe, lamb liver, broccoli, cauliflower, carrot, silver beet (spinach), cabbage, apples, pears, lamb hearts, lamb kidneys and garlic.  Which food do you think is safer for your pet?

The premix danger is very real because nearly every premix is manufactured overseas where production costs are low and standards are even lower.  The frightening part is that pet owners can’t tell if the premix in their food comes from China because it does not have to be listed on the label.  The only way to know is to phone the manufacturer and ask if the premix is made in the US or overseas.

Made in the USA

If you have made the phone call and found out that your pet food’s premix has been manufactured in the US, don’t start feeling all warm and fuzzy just yet.  The individual synthetic vitamins and minerals that are in that made-in-the-US premix are almost all manufactured in India or China so it may or may not be a safe option after all.  In the end, some pet food manufacturers do their best to source out the safest premixes possible – but it is difficult for them to determine where the individual ingredients originated from and what quality control measures were put in place.

Who’s watching the hen house?

The million dollar question is, if pet food manufacturers can’t prove the origin of their premixes, why don’t they test every batch of food?  The answer might shock you:  it is so cost prohibitive that it is actually cheaper for them to pay the lawsuits from our dead pets than it is to test their product.

In January 2011, the FDA  finally stepped in with their Food Safety Modernization Act.  Some provisions took effect immediately but to date have had a minimal impact on most pet food manufacturers.

FSMA provisions already in effect include emergency FDA access to a company’s records and mandatory recall authority for the FDA if a company refuses to voluntarily recall a product. The agency also has to find “reasonable probability” the product is adulterated and that consumption of the food will cause serious adverse health consequences or death.

As part of the focus on preventive controls, FSMA is planning an FDA inspection schedule. High-risk facilities, which FDA has yet to define, will be inspected at least every three years, while any facility not deemed high risk will be inspected at least every five years. Any sort of complaint or safety problem will increase the likelihood of more frequent inspections or re-inspections, for which the company will probably have to cover the costs.

As part of FSMA’s Foreign Supplier Verification Program, every importer must establish a plan that verifies the foreign supplier complies with a hazard analysis and preventive controls program.

It remains to be seen how much influence the FSMA will have on pet food manufacturers but, as of today, nothing much has been done yet.  Because the FSMA also applies to human foods and food-animal feeds, it remains to be seen how much time and effort will be spent inspecting pet foods in the years to come.

What you can do

In the meantime, it is likely safe to assume that virtually nobody is actively protecting your pet from poisoned pet foods.  The safest thing you can do for you pet is to feed him a raw or home prepared diet – or a commercial diet that doesn’t contain premixes.  Maria Ringo, founder of Sojourner Farms, one of the first commercially available raw food mixture, and Carna4, a small, ethical kibble manufacturer that tests every batch recommends the following steps to minimize the risk of commercial foods and treats:

  • Seek out companies that are transparent about testing for toxins. Make sure they test both ingredients and finished batches for mycotoxins and bacteria before it is packaged. And if, for example, you are concerned about mercury levels in the salmon in your pet food, ask the company if they test for that, too.
  • Look for products free of synthetic ingredients of any kind. Vitamins from food are hardier than those made in test tubes.  Read the ingredients panel to spot the chemicals usually listed at the end, likely made in unregulated offshore facilities.
  • Feed products with only table-grade food ingredients, e.g. federally inspected for human consumption, to reduce the risk of bacterial and viral pathogens like salmonella. This applies to all products including frozen and dehydrated meats.

Food safety issues for both raw and processed foods will be discussed in the May 2012 issue of Dogs Naturally.

In the meantime, if you want to avoid the dangers of foods manufactured in China, you must look beyond the label.  Do your homework and ask the manufacturer the hard questions.  Be an active advocate for your pets.  And please pass this article on to as many dog and cat owners as possible so they can also protect their pets.  We are receiving dozens of emails from pet owners who have lost their pets to sudden kidney failure in the last month or two and there are several major manufacturers implicated.  We are compiling as much information on this as possible, but in the meantime, please help us to help pets by sharing this information.

 

 
 
Trackback from your site.
 

Dog Food Reviews

The Dog Food Advisor\’s unbiased dog food reviews and dog food ratings searchable by brand or star rating. Find the best dry, canned or raw food for your dog.

via Dog Food Reviews.

White Oak Golden Retrievers
http://www.whiteoakgoldenretrievers.com

English Cream Golden Retrievers
British Cream Golden Retrievers

Ten Vaccine Myths

Ten Vaccine Myths

Written by Catherine O’Driscoll on June 11, 2011. Posted in Vaccine Articles and News 20 Comments

 
 

Myth No. 1

Vaccines protect our dogs against disease, helping to ensure they live long, healthy, happy lives.

Wrong!

Vaccines only sometimes protect our dogs against disease (if at all).  Scientific studies into human vaccines have shown that just as many  vaccinated people, and sometimes more vaccinated people, contract  diseases as do unvaccinated people.

A study conducted by Canine Health Concern during 1997, involving 2,700  dogs, showed that 68.2% of dogs in the survey with parvovirus contracted  it within three months of being vaccinated. Similarly, 55.6% of dogs  with distemper contracted it within three months of vaccination; 63.6%  contracted hepatitis within three months of vaccination; 50% contracted  parainfluenza within three months of vaccination; and every single dog  with leptospirosis contracted it within that three month timeframe.

So vaccines represent – at best – only a 50/50 chance of protection. But  if you doubt the validity of the CHC survey, ask around. It won’t take  long to find people whose dogs contracted these diseases shortly after  being vaccinated. In a parvo vaccine trial conducted by Dr Ronald D  Schultz, head of pathobiology at Wisconsin University, three out of six  parvo vaccine brands totally failed to give protection; two gave only  partial protection; and only one was shown to be effective.

Myth No. 2

Vaccines have eradicated epidemics.

Wrong!

Vaccine manufacturers like to claim this. But research shows that  vaccines are generally introduced after the disease has died out:  diseases die out after 67% of a population has been exposed to it. The  smallpox vaccine is often quoted as having eradicated smallpox. In fact,  scientists stopped using it when they finally admitted that it was  causing too many side-effects.

Only then did the disease die out.

There are strong arguments to suggest that vaccines keep diseases in the  eco-system. For example, the only cause of polio in the USA today is  the vaccine itself. (You can get polio if you change the nappy of a baby  who has recently been vaccinated against polio.) Vaccines also shed  into the environment, so a vaccinated or unvaccinated dog or cat can  contract a disease from the urine and faeces of a vaccinated dog or cat.

Myth No. 3

Vaccines are extremely safe.

Wrong!

No-one can legitimately claim that vaccines are safe – because no-one  has conducted the necessary research to make that claim. There are no  long-term studies to show the long-term effects of vaccines on humans,  let alone dogs.

Myth No. 4

Only a tiny minority of genetically-susceptible dogs will suffer adverse reactions to vaccines.

Wrong!

Whilst some dogs will have genetic weaknesses that make vaccines more  dangerous to them, there are many other factors which can put your dog  at risk.

Vaccine manufacturers warn, in their data sheets, that the following  factors can render vaccines harmful (they use the phrase,  “immunocompetence may be compromised” ):

1. if the dog is genetically defective 2. if there is something wrong with the dog’s diet 3. if the dog was unhealthy when vaccinated 4. if the dog is stressed at time of injection 5. if the dog’s immune system is incompetent 6. if the dog is exposed to a virus shortly after vaccination 7. if the dog is taking immune suppressant drugs such as steroids 8. if the vet stores and handles the vaccine inappropriately 9. if the dog is incubating disease at the time of vaccination

And if no-one is recording the adverse effects of vaccines effectively,  then how can anyone say only a ‘tiny minority’ have adverse reactions?  In the UK, vets are asked (not compelled) to report adverse reactions if  they suspect an adverse vaccine reaction. If a dog falls down having an  epileptic fit within half an hour, ten days, or a month of vaccination,  the vet very often fails to suspect a link – even though vaccines are  known to cause epilepsy, and the human Vaccine Damage Compensation Unit  has paid up to £30,000 to parents whose children were made epileptic by  vaccines. Even if the vet does suspect a link, there is no law to make  him report the suspected reaction. Many vets are too busy to complete  the necessary paperwork. The same applies to other diseases which many  scientists contend are vaccine-related – such as skin disease,  arthritis, cancer, encephalitis, etc.

Myth No. 5

“I am a vet, and I have only seen one vaccine reaction in 20 years’ of practice.”

Wrong!

You only think you have seen one vaccine reaction in twenty years of  practice! Vets have been trained to look for an immediate reaction –  where the dog is allergic to the vaccine (this allergy is the basis for  the genetic link claim). In the event of an allergic reaction –  sometimes called anaphylaxis or a hypersensitivity reaction – the vet is  advised to inject adrenalin into the animal to save his life.

Because vaccine components can remain in the system for long periods of  time, and because most of these disease take time to show themselves,  causal link is rarely established. Unless, that is, scientists take the  time (despite fears that their funding might be withdrawn by the  pharmaceutical industry) to study the facts.

Research papers published by eminent scientists show that the following diseases can be caused by vaccines:

Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia

A dreadful disease that usually kills a dog within days. Progress of the  disease closely resembles the last stages of AIDS. Cancer – Dr Denis W  Macey was reported in an American veterinary paper as saying that up to  22,000 cats develop cancer at the site of vaccination every year in the  USA.

The Salk Polio Vaccine

Administered to thousands of people in the 1950s and ’60s was  contaminated with a Simian (monkey) retrovirus (called SV40) that has  been found at human cancer sites. An Avian (bird) retrovirus has also  been found at human cancer sites, suspected to have come from the MMR  vaccine. Monkey kidneys, chick embryos, dog brains and kidney, and cat  brains and kidneys are all commonly used as vaccine culture media. If  the animal used as a culture medium for vaccines carries a retrovirus  and this is undetected and left in the vaccine, the vaccine can  permanently alter the genes of the animal or human receiving the  vaccine.

Genetic defects

The significance of vaccines’ gene altering potential is alarming. For  example, SV40 has been found at cancer sites belonging to the children  of people who received the SV40-contaminated Salk Polio vaccine. SV40  switches off the part of the DNA that protects from cancer, and this  defect can be inherited.

Although the British government was informed that the polio vaccine was  contaminated at the time, they took the decision to use it anyway.  Records have now been destroyed (to protect the guilty?). Once it was  decided it was too risky to continue using the contaminated vaccine on  the UK population, it was sold overseas to unsuspecting ‘foreigners’.

So God help your dog. Thyroid disease is inheritable; and this can be  caused by vaccines. Once a dog has underlying thyroid disease, he or she  only needs a trigger – from a vaccine, an environmental pollutant, from  stress, or from dietary inadequacies – to develop full-blown autoimmune  diseases. Thyroid disease can often be undetected. For example,  behavioural problems, hormonal imbalances, nymphomania, and coat loss  can by symptoms of thyroid disease, but are often treated at face value  without establishing the underlying cause.

Leukaemia

Dr Jean Dodds, one of the world’s foremost experts in canine vaccine  reactions, says: “Recent vaccinations with single or combination  modified live virus (MLV) vaccines are increasingly recognised  contributors to immune-mediated blood diseases, bone marrow failure, and  organ dysfunction.”

Dr Dodds lists leukaemia, thyroid disease, Addison’s disease, diabetes,  and lymphoma as diseases that can be triggered by vaccines.

Parvovirus

Yes, parvovirus was created by vaccines. This disease didn’t exist prior  to the 1970s. In fact, scientists tell us it was created by vaccine  manufacturers who cultured the distemper vaccine on cat kidneys that  were infected with feline enteritis. This cat-enteritis-diseased  distemper vaccine was then injected into dogs around the world, and  parvovirus reared its ugly head around the world at the same time.  Similarly, human AIDS is thought by some scientists to be a  vaccine-induced plague. HIV (humans), FIV (cats), and SIV (monkeys) are  closely related viruses. Two separate scientific papers link the  emergence of HIV in humans with the use of SIV-infected polio vaccines  (cultured on monkey kidneys) on male homosexuals in New York, and  innocent citizens of the Belgian Congo.

Arthritis

If there is a history of arthritis, epilepsy or allergies in a human  family, doctors will often refrain from vaccinating a child. Arthritis  is an inflammatory (hypersensitivity/allergy) disease. Vaccines contain  various components, including serum (often bovine serum posing a BSE  type threat), formaldehyde, aluminium, and mercury. Is it any wonder  that an animal might become hypersensitive or inflamed after having  these poisons injected into hm? According to one vaccine manufacturer,  vaccines that are cultured on animal tissue can contain ‘extraneous  proteins’ that can cause autoimmune diseases. Arthritis is an autoimmune  disease, and it was found in the CHC survey to manifest in clusters  nine months after vaccination. Animals with a genetic pre-disposition to  allergies (ie ‘people’ from families with a history of irritable bowel  syndrome/Crohns disease/enteritis, asthma, hay fever, eczema, and so  on), can become more allergic, or become highly sensitised, when you  inject foreign proteins (serums and organ tissue) into them. Veterinary  manuals talk openly about serum reactions.

Allergies

There are many, many research papers showing a link between allergies and vaccines. In 1983, for example, Frick and Brooks published a paper to show that  inhalant allergies (such as atopic dermatitis) have developed in dogs  when vaccinated with distemper, hepatitis and leptospirosis vaccines  just prior to, but not after, exposure to pollen extracts. ‘Atopic’  means an inherited pre-disposition to produce excess amounts of IgE  antibodies in response to antigens (the things the animal is allergic to  such as pollen, flea bites, dust mites, etc.). As a result the allergic  individuals suffer chronically irritating skin inflammations. Other  organs may exhibit signs of hypersensitivity causing, for example,  conjunctivitis or rhinitis. Homoeopathic vets treat a large proportion  of skin problems as ‘vaccinosis’ (a morbid reaction to vaccines).

Epilepsy

As stated earlier, it is scientifically recognised that vaccines can  cause epilepsy in humans. Dr Hans Selye published a famous paper in  ‘Nature’ in 1936 which explained how an organism will react to a massive  challenge (such as a vaccine). Every system of the body springs into  action, and a hormone called DOC can be released. This hormone can cause  brain lesions and destruction of large parts of the brain. Epilepsy is a  neurological (brain) condition. In addition, this brain damage can lead  to behavioural problems. Harris L Coulter has published a very  convincing argument to suggest that unprovoked aggression in humans has  its base in encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) caused by vaccines.

Myth No. 6

Vaccine manufacturers have to undergo stringent procedures and tests to ensure safety.

Wrong!

OK, partly true . . . vaccine manufacturers have to go through safety  procedures and tests, but to claim that these tests are stringent is  highly subjective. How, then, did SV40 get through; how did the avian  virus get into the MMR vaccine; how did parvovirus slip through the net;  and how did AIDS suddenly arrive from nowhere? In actual fact, no-one  is permitted (in the UK at least) to test the viral component of a  veterinary vaccine except a vaccine manufacturer. They are the only ones  with a license to do it. This means that if you suspect a vaccine  killed your puppy, you have to take the vaccine company’s word for it if  they say it didn’t.

There’s no-one to go to if you want an independent check.

Myth No. 7

It’s better to risk a vaccine reaction than subject my dog to these deadly killer diseases.

Wrong!

Firstly, very few of the classic canine diseases are deadly.

Parvovirus is only generally deadly to puppies and, as maternal antibody  can be present for as many as 22 weeks, and as maternal antibody  cancels out the vaccine, vaccinated puppies are unlikely to be protected  from parvovirus. Adult dogs rarely die from parvovirus. Distemper kills only half of affected dogs. Indeed, dogs most  susceptible to disease are those who are fed poor quality processed  foods (and don’t imagine that price equals quality). A dog fed a natural  diet, containing ‘real’ food, is most able to combat any viral  challenges. Also, please be aware that there is an alternative to a  highly risky vaccine – this is discussed later. Clinical signs of  hepatitis and parainfluenza range from mild and invisible to death (the  flu rarely kills; hepatitis can be caused by a range of factors,  including poor diet, and the vaccine doesn’t protect against all of the  other dangers). Secondly, no-one knows how common these diseases are.  No-one records their existence.

Leptospirosis, for example, is extremely rare (apart from which,  leptospirosis is a range of over a hundred bacterins; the chances of the  strain in the needle matching the strain in the field are remote; and  the vaccine only confers protection for between three and six months,  leaving vaccinated dogs ‘unprotected’ for up to nine months anyway).  Vaccines have also been known to cause the diseases they were designed  to prevent. This happens when a vaccine is injected into an animal with a  suppressed immune system (caused by genetic factors, poor diet, stress,  existing illness, etc.); or when the vaccine manufacturer fails to  render the viral component of the vaccine harmless in the lab. In the  latter instance, the vaccine is withdrawn after it has killed ‘more dogs  than normally expected’ (in the words of one vaccine manufacturer as it  withdrew its vaccine).

Canine Health Concern’s vaccine survey indicated that at least one in  every hundred dogs is damaged by vaccines. As no-one has any statistics  to suggest otherwise, it should be up to vets and vaccine manufacturers  to prove vaccines are safe – and not the other way round. We whose dogs  have died or suffered chronic debilitating diseases shouldn’t have to  take their word for it when the vaccine manufacturers deny  responsibility. Our concerns should be taken seriously, and not  strenuously denied in the face of overwhelming evidence.

Myth No. 8

The homoeopathic vaccine alternative is unproven.

Wrong!

Existing research and experience shows that the homoeopathic nosode is  as protective – but probably more protective – than vaccines. Whereas  the medical and veterinary ‘professions’ receive huge sums of money from  international multi-billion dollar pharmaceutical conglomerates, please  note that homoeopaths do not. Rather, vets who trust the less expensive  homoeopathic alternative suffer serious financial loss by refusing to  sell highly lucrative annual boosters. A growing number of dog lovers  are beginning to choose the homoeopathic alternative to vaccines. Some  have been using the nosode for up to twenty years, and claim that they  have never had a problem.

Myth No. 9

You should vaccinate your dog every year.

Wrong!

If you hear nothing else, if you can accept nothing else, please know  that annual vaccination is not necessary. Please do not subject your  dogs to the vaccine risk year after year until they drop.

Once immunity to a virus exists, it persists for the lifetime of the  host. In the case of leptospirosis (a bacterial disease), I have already  explained that the vaccine is virtually useless and therefore not worth  the risk.

One American veterinary vaccine manufacturer has made a public  announcement, saying that it no longer recommends annual vaccination.  Several American veterinary colleges have announced the same, in  reaction to consumer pressure and fears over adverse reactions.

One veterinary college said that annual vaccination has no scientific  basis, and we might as well have chosen ‘every full moon’ to stick the  needle in. And please be aware that a vaccine administered to a puppy,  when his immune system is immature, is probably the most harmful jab of  all, capable of wreaking havoc – havoc that you might not be able to  detect immediately.

Myth No. 10

My doctor/vet knows best.

Wrong!

Doctors and vets are trained in a very specific healing discipline. They  know a little about pharmaceuticals, and some of them know about  surgery.

But they rely upon the pharmaceutical industry to tell them which drugs  to use in which circumstances. When a conventionally trained scientist  tells you that homeopathy doesn’t work, you may as well ask your  butcher whether electricity works – the fact is, conventional vets  rarely have any knowledge of homeopathy to base their opinions on.  Homeopaths do not claim to be able to reverse all vaccine damage, and  conventional vets – not even recognizing vaccine damage – have little  success.

Once you’ve administered the needle, you can never change your mind. Please STUDY THE FACTS, don’t live to regret it.

10 Easy Pieces to Liven Up Your Dog’s Dinner | The Bark

10 Easy Pieces to Liven Up Your Dog’s Dinner | The Bark.

FDA Investigates Nutro Dog Food | The Bark

FDA Investigates Nutro Dog Food | The Bark.

Beneful Dog Food-BEWARE!

Dog owners blame Beneful for their pets’ illness

Pet owners around the country report similar problems in their dogs

01/08/2013 |ConsumerAffairs| Pets

 

By James R. Hood

                                    ConsumerAffairs’ founder and editor, Jim Hood formerly headed Associated Press Broadcast News, directing coverage of major news events worldwide. He also served as Senior Vice President of United Press International and was the founder and editor of Zapnews, a newswire service for radio and television.                                 

 

PhotoNew federal food safety regulations may make food safer for humans in a few years but what about pet food? Well, in theory, it’s already regulated as tightly as food processed for human consumption, which may be part of the problem.

There is a long history of pet food recalls and reports of pet deaths attributed to salmonella, molds and other contaminants in pet food but most cases are never solved, in large part because the evidence — the sick animal and the suspect food — are long gone by the time investigators begin their work.

The latest pet food to enrage pet owners is Purina’s Beneful. A spurt of complaints over the last few months has been accompanied by a large increase in the number of people reading the Beneful reviews posted by ConsumerAffairs readers.

“I switched to Beneful about two months ago. Two weeks ago my maltipoo Buster stopped eating and started throwing up, followed by bloody diarrhea. He died within a week,” said one angry reader. “Then my maltese Layla had the same symptoms everytime she ate Beneful dog food. I started feeding her home-cooked food like boiled chicken and she is 100 percent better. Buster is dead because of beneful.”

Purina did not respond to a request for its response to the consumers’ reports.

It’s not just pet owners who are concerned. The Dog Food Advisor website gives dry Beneful its lowest rating and lists it as “not recommended.” Although the site’s editor, Mike Sagman, is not a veterinarian, he is a graduate of the Medical College of Virginia with a doctoral degree in dental surgery and an undergraduate degree in chemistry. Sagman says he has published more than 700 dog food reviews.

Action required

Photo
Judy of Suffern, NY, sent us this photo of her intubated Siberian Husky

But the problems pet owners are reporting are even more serious than Sagman’s review might indicate — and, in fact, are so serious that pet owners whose pets become ill after eating Beneful should see their veterinarian quickly.

LaShanda of Silver Spring, Md., did just that when her dog became ill in November and she credits reviews posted on ConsumerAffairs by other pet owners with spurring her to take action.

“I have been feeding my dog, a 4-year-old, 10-lb Havanese, Purina Beneful dog food for over the past year. I began noticing changes in my dog’s behavior after opening the new bag and feeding it to her. During the course of the week she was on the new bag of dog food, she was listless, barely eating her food and vomited twice,” LaShanda said. Things deteriorated from there, as she tells it:

“Her stomach was very upset and she refused to eat her dog food and attempted to eat grass when she was outside to induce vomiting. Her skin felt extremely hot to the touch and she was lethargic. On Tuesday, November 20th, I arrived home to find diarrhea in the bathroom and one of her eyes swollen shut. I rushed her to the emergency medical clinic where blood work was done. …

My veterinarian believes that there is a direct relationship between Purina’s Beneful dog food and my pet’s onset of health problems. Additionally, the symptoms that he originally believed to be as a reaction to seasonal allergies, is a result of this dog food. He notated the name of the dog food, lot number, and the place of purchase for future reference for his other patients.

Fortunately, due to my quick response in seeking medical attention, after receiving medication and being on a bland diet for approximately 6 days, my dog is in recovery and seems to be stable.In the past week, two of my friends that also feed their dogs Beneful, have had to rush their dogs to the emergency vet (one had a seizure and the other couldn’t stop vomiting…also they live on completely different sides of the country).

This site is what actually made me rush to the emergency vet myself and seek medical care (and could single-handly be responsible for why she is still alive). I STRONGLY urge everyone here to file a formal complaint with the FDA:

http://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/SafetyHealth/ReportaProblem/ucm182403.htm

 

White Oak Golden Retrievers

www.whiteoakgoldenretrievers.com

White Oak Golden Retrievers – Testimonials

Steve was

gracious enough to meet us half way to pick up our puppy, that was more

than we could ask for. I could tell with talking to Jeannette before purchasing

our new member of the family, that she was so passionate about her dogs.

I spent a lot of hours on the phone getting to know her. I can’t believe

he is almost a year old, on Feb 15, he is truly a wonderful dog. He is

half English/half American, he is so smart and loving. He is more independent

than our previous Goldens, but so loving. We had actually went to pick

up another puppy from someone else, two weeks previous to getting him.

We went and picked him up and I just knew it was not right,we turned around

and took him back. I felt really silly, but I knew that puppy wasn’t for

me. Tressel loves everybody, and everybody loves him. I would have more

if my husband would let me. We have a couple acres for him to run and

play, and I think he uses every inch. The neighbors all love to watch

him play, he loves to go to splash camp and swim and play with the other

dogs. I could go on and on about how wonderful he is.

 

White Oak Golden Retrievers

www.whiteoakgoldenretrievers.com

White Oak Golden Retrievers – Testimonial

There are

not enough words to describe the wonderful experience that we had purchasing

Sampson from you. You are always eager to help with any questions that

we have had, I would have to say that dealing with you and your family

in the purchase of Sampson was one of the best experiences of my lifetime.

The first time we spoke you treated me as a friend and like we had known

each other for years. I felt honored that you sold us one of your pups.

He is the most lovable and happy golden that I have ever met.

 

www.whiteoakgoldenretrievers.com

White Oak Golden Retrievers