Posts Tagged ‘lyme disease’

Lyme Disease-A Holistic Approach

A Homeopathic Protocol for Lyme Disease

 

tick infested small

If you live in a Lyme disease endemic area such as the Northeast and upper Midwest and your dog is the outdoorsy type who picks up ticks on his adventures, you can use homeopathy to good effect in protecting him against Lyme disease.

Joette Calabrese, HMC, CCH, RSHom(NA) is a distinguished American homeopath, public speaker and author. Find her at joettecalabrese.com. Joette’s family lives in the country, with plenty of deer and other critters nearby. The surrounding woods are considered a Lyme tick Mecca. She’s successfully used the protocol described below for many years on Buster (described as “the bad office dog”) as well as her human family members.

This protocol is not for long-term, chronic Lyme disease; for that you’ll need to seek the expertise of a seasoned veterinary homeopath.

First, the tick

When you find a tick on your dog, the first thing to do is remove the tick as soon as possible. There are several techniques you can use; read about them here.

ticks

Save the tick by placing it in a covered jar with either 180 proof vodka, grain alcohol or brandy and label it with the date, on whom it was found and where on the body. In the unlikely event that all else fails, the tick can be made into a homeopathic remedy. This is known as isopathy, which works under principles similar to homeopathy.

But for now, just keep the tick in a jar.

Then follow whichever steps below are appropriate for your dog’s situation, depending on how long ago the bite occurred and whether he is displaying any symptoms of Lyme disease.

 

Step 1 – for prevention after a recent bite

This has been found to be highly effective for bites that are rather recent – say within a few weeks.

Remedy: Ledum palustre 200C

Ledum is the foremost remedy for any kind of animal bite.

  • Give the first dose of this remedy at the time you remove the tick.
  • Continue dosing with Ledum every 3 hours for the first day
  • Then, dose twice daily for a week
  • After the first week, dose twice weekly for a month
  • Then once per week for another month

This is probably overkill, but worth the extra effort to be certain.

If the tick was discovered in the last few days, Step 1 is likely all you’ll need.

But if your dog has been diagnosed with Lyme disease that is older and more entrenched, follow Step 1 as above, then add Step 2 at any time after using Ledum.

Step 2 – in the event of a Lyme diagnosis

Remedy: Aurum arsenicum 200C 

Aurum arsenicum is a capital choice for when a poisonous infection arises, and this is one of those times.

  • Dose twice daily for one week
  • After the first week, dose twice weekly for a month
  • Then once per week for another month

For older cases in which it is critical to take all precautions because illness has set in, follow Step 3 along with the previous remedies.

 Step 3 – when there are clinical symptoms of Lyme

Remedy: Borrelia burgdorferi 30C (also called Lyme Nosode 30C)

Borrelia is the remedy made from the Lyme tick.

  • Dose with Borrelia once per day for three days and then stop, for a total of three doses
  • This may need to be repeated every few months if the symptoms remain.

Symptoms

In older cases of Lyme, the most common symptoms in dogs are arthritis or painful joints and lameness; other symptoms may include fever, lack of appetite, depression or lethargy. Dogs do not exhibit the classic “bulls eye” rash that occurs in humans. Symptoms can occur two to five months after exposure. If your dog shows these symptoms, it’s best to consult an experienced homeopathic vet who can prescribe the correct remedy for his symptoms, along with the above procedures.

How effective is this protocol?

When Step 1 is used at the right time, it’s rare that Lyme disease will develop.

In older cases, where there is a Lyme diagnosis or symptoms, success can frequently be achieved, but may be affected by how entrenched the disease is, whether (and how often) antibiotics and other allopathic drugs have been employed, as well as the general vital force of the dog.

Joette Calabrese has generously shared this protocol and asks that if you know someone who should have this information, please pass it along. Spread the good news of how homeopathy can help!

Aritcle from Dog’s Natually Magazine

So many of our dog owners are concerned and worried about Lyme Disease.  This article gives some answers and alternatives for this mounting problem.  White Oak Golden Retrievers

http://www.whiteoakgoldenretrievers.com

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Holistic Tick Repellant for Dogs

Reports say that 2014 will be the worst year for ticks. 

This could be the most important thing that you see me post! Its an epidemic this year, and these things are as lethal… as a venomous snake in the wrong scenario! Please not only read it, but share it! Make sure we get the word out about these ticks and the disease they carry!

It’s summer! Time for camping, hiking and getting outside to play. Don’t let those pesky annoying ticks stop you. Here’s how with a simple homemade solution!

Repellent for your pets:

For pets, add 1 cup of water to a spray bottle, followed by 2 cups of distilled white vinegar. Ticks hate the smell and taste of vinegar, and will be easily be repelled by this ingredient alone. Then, add two spoonfuls of vegetable or almond oil, which both contain sulfur (another natural tick repellent).

To make a repellent that will also deter fleas, mix in a few spoonfuls of lemon juice, citrus oil, or peppermint oil, any of which will repel ticks and fleas while also creating a nicely scented repellent. Spray onto the pet’s dry coat, staying away from sensitive areas including eyes, nose, mouth, and genitals. When outdoors for an extended period, spray this solution on two to three times per day.

For you and your family:

In a spray bottle, mix 2 cups of distilled white vinegar and 1 cup of water. To make a scented solution so you do not smell like bitter vinegar all day, add 20 drops of your favorite essential oil. Eucalyptus oil is a calm, soothing scent that also works as a tick repellent, while peppermint and citrus oils give off a strong crisp scent that also repel ticks.

After mixing the solution, spray onto clothing, skin, and hair before going outdoors. Reapply every four hours to keep ticks at bay, and examine your skin and hair when back inside to make sure no ticks are on the body. ~~Sharing is CARING ! ~~ WE must spread the word about the dangers of Ticks and how to avoid them!

White Oak Golden Retrievers

http://www.whiteoakgoldenretrievers.com

Lyme Disease Vaccine for Dogs

 LYME–Vaccinate or Not?


PERMISSION GRANTED TO CROSS-POST THIS MESSAGE.
In response to questions about Lyme disease in dogs and the Lyme vaccine, I would like to share the advice that Dr. Ronald Schultz, Chair of Pathobiological Sciences at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine gave me for my 2 dogs, who both receive(d) (one died in July from a mast cell tumor which developed at a rabies vaccination site) 100+ tick bites a summer.
I was concerned after having contracted Lyme twice myself; however, none of the dogs we have had over 30 years were ever vaccinated against Lyme or ever contracted the disease. After getting it myself, I was reconsidering. Dr. Schultz advised me that there was far more risk associated with the Lyme vaccine than there was with antibiotics to treat the disease if one or both dogs contracted Lyme.
He further explained that if they tested positive for Lyme, but displayed no symptoms, then not to treat them with antibiotics because it indicated that they had been exposed to the disease, but hadn’t contracted the disease. However, he said, that if they tested positive for Lyme and had symptoms (lameness, fever, lethargy, etc..), then start treatment. Dr. Schultz elaborated by telling me that in vaccinology, immunology, the point is not to prevent infection, it is to prevent disease. In fact, low-grade infections are introduced to elicit immune responses, which is how vaccination works, by introducing an attenuated (weakened) antigen into the animal’s system.
Further, he said that a positive Lyme test in an ASYMPTOMATIC dog merely reflects the fact that the dog has been exposed; positive Lyme test in a dog with SYMPTOMS indicates that the animal has contracted the disease and needs treatment.
Based on his advice, I have chosen to not vaccinate my dog(s) against Lyme. Below are links to a few articles on the subject which may help you in deciding whether or not to vaccinate your dog against Lyme.
Lyme is a “killed” vaccine and is associated with clinically significant adverse reactions. According to the 2003 AAHA Guidelines (Page 16), “…killed vaccines are much more likely to cause hypersensitivity reactions (e.g., immune-mediated disease).” Further, the AAHA task force reports on Page 18 that, “Bacterial vaccines, especially killed whole organism products …..are much more likely to cause adverse reactions than subunit or live bacterial vaccines or MLV vaccines, especially if given topically. Several killed bacterial products are used as immunomodulators/adjuvants. Thus, their presence in a combination vaccine product may enhance or suppress the immune response or may cause an undesired response (e.g., IgE hypersensitivity or a class of antibody that is not protective).”
Dr. Alice Wolf, Professor of Small Animal Internal Medicine at Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine, stated in an address Vaccines of the Present and Future WSAVA 2001 – Vaccines of the Present and Future at the 2001 World Small Animal Veterinary Association World Congress that Lyme vaccines : “are only partially effective and may cause serious immune-mediated consequences in some dogs that are as serious or more serious than the disease itself…..The most reactive vaccines for dogs include leptospirosis bacterin and Borrelia [Lyme]vaccine .”.
Canine Lyme, What’s New? Vet Tech: Canine Lyme: What’s New?
No Lyme Vaccine for Charlie Nancy Freedman Smith, Maine Today Error
It is not a scientifically based recommendation to suggest that all dogs in Maine should be vaccinated with Lyme Vaccine. There may be select areas in the state, “hot spots” where infection is very high and vaccination would be indicated, but dogs in most parts of the state would probably not receive benefit and may actually be at risk of adverse reactions if a large scale vaccination program was initiated. Wisconsin has a much higher risk of Lyme than Maine, however at our Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (VMTH) we have used almost no Lyme vaccine since it was first USDA approved in the early 1990’s. What we have found is infection (not disease), in much of Wisconsin, is low (<10% infection). As you know, infection does not mean disease. About 3 to 4% of infected dogs develop disease. In contrast, in Western and Northwestern parts of Wisconsin infection occurs in 60 to 90% of all dogs. In those areas, vaccination is of benefit in reducing clinical disease. …….. Also, vaccinated dogs can develop disease as efficacy of the product is about 60 to 70% in preventing disease, thus antibiotics must be used in vaccinated dogs developing disease, just like it must be used in non-vaccinated diseased dogs. Therefore, in general areas with a low infection rate <10>50%) then the vaccine will be very useful. Thus, I believe it is irresponsible to suggest that all dogs in Maine should be vaccinated . Veterinarians should know, based on diagnoses in their clinic and other clinics in the area (town), how common the disease would be and they should base their judgment to vaccinate on risk, not on a statement that all dogs in Maine need Lyme vaccine!
R.D. Schultz
_______________________________ Ronald D. Schultz, Professor and Chair
Department of Pathobiological Sciences School of Veterinary Medicine
University of Wisconsin-Madison 2015 Linden Drive West Madison, WI 53706″
 
White Oak Golden Retrievers