Archive for the ‘Golden Retrievers’ Category

Dogs and Vaccines

New science comes out all the time concerning our dog’s health.  This information can be life altering to you and your dog.

At the top of the list now, is “Vaccines”.  What vaccines are necessary, at what age should they be given and which ones potentially could harm our dogs.

Vaccines are necessary because many diseases are life threatening, but…some of these very same vaccines are now known to cause other problems.  Problems like; joint and hip dysplasia, aggression, lymphoma-yes lymphoma ( a death sentence for your dog. )

Here at White Oak Golden Retrievers we believe in limited vaccines, holistic vet care and of course, a species appropriate diet.

There are many sources that you can research to get the most up to date information on what vaccines to give, when to give them, and which ones can wait.

Visit our website; http://www.whiteoakgoldenretrievers.com and then click on our “health and diet” page to start your research.  We hope you will join us in our quest to keep our dogs living longer and free of disease.

White Oak Golden Retrievers

http://www.whiteoakgoldenretrievers.com

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Rabies and Cancer

Rabies and Cancer:

A very interesting article on rabies and cancer in dogs.

http://www.thedogplace.org/VACCINES/Vaccine-reaction-essay-tumor-photos-P.Jordan-DVM-136158.asp

White Oak Golden Retrievers

http://www.whiteoakgoldenretrievers.com

 

Heartworm Medications For Dogs

Are drug companies honest about Heartworm?

By Dr. Peter Dobias

Holistic look at the Heartworm prevention

 

A few days ago,  one of my friends living in Vermont called me. She was wondering what I thought about heartworm prevention and if I could help her determine, if the monthly administration of heartworm preventive medication is really necessary.

The question threw me back in the 90’s, when the manufacturers of heartworm preventive drugs decided to take North America by storm. I remembered he drug reps visiting vet clinics on a regular basis telling us that it was only a matter of time and heartworm would widely spread in Canada.  These visits were also accompanied by a subtle suggestion that selling the heartworm tests and preventive drugs could be a significant source of income for the practice.

 

 

As time progressed,  the heartworm doom and gloom case scenario didn’t happen and that the risks of heartworm infection in my areas were clearly exaggerated.

On the basis of my findings, I made a decision not to recommend Heartworm preventive drugs in the area practice because the risk was practically zero and administering of any drugs is never optimal.  In reality no one can be absolutely certain if down the road preventive medication doesn’t  increase the tendency to chronic disease, organ failure or even cancer.

On the other hand, my friend’s situation is quite different because she lives in the Eastern US where heartworm is a real possibility.  I saw her question as a great opportunity for me to review the lifecycle of heartworm once again to  see if drug companies were honest about their recommendations of monthly prevention.  To me, the monthly administration frequency  seemed to be kind of peculiar because as far as I know, parasites do not carry an iPhone with a calendar and schedule.

I decided to bring clarity in the current situation to see what  the frequency of  heartworm preventive drugs really needed to be and also tell you more about the heartworm prevention alternatives that I use with my dog Skai. In order to do so, I need to give you answers to the following questions:

  1. What is the risk of heartworm disease in the area?

  2. What is the minimal frequency of administering preventive drugs?

  3. Are there any alternatives?

 

Here are the answers:

 

1. Heartworm incidence:

Heartworm life cycle is dependent on temperature that must remain above 57 degrees F  (14 C ) for at least 45 days straight and at least 2 weeks of temperatures over 80 F ( If these conditions are not fulfilled, the parasite cycle cannot be completed and your dog is safe.

Based on the recommendations of Dr. David Knight and Dr. James Lok from the American Heartworm society, even with the most cautious conventional medical protocols, all year around heartworm preventive schedule is exaggerated with the exception of Florida, some parts of Texas and Hawaii.  According to their conventional opinion, preventive treatment is unnecessary in the winter months and definitely doesn’t  need to be started before or after the months noted on the map in their paper.

 

2. Heartworm life cycle

Before you sucumb to the marketing pressure and fear to administer heartworm medicine monthly,  I  urge you to learn more about the heartworm life cycle. The heartworm development goes through several stages before reaching maturity and it takes 2.5 to 4 months before the tiny stage of microfilaria leaves the muscles and starts settling in the pulmonary artery. When heartworm reaches its final destination of pulmonary artery near the heart, it takes about 3 – 4 months to reach maturity.

One doesn’t need to have a degree in math to figure that it takes somewhere between 5.5 to 8 months for microfilaria to mature into an adult worm and that your dog  should be safe if you administer heartworm meds only once every every 3 to 4 months if your live in the area where heartworm occurs.

So why would the drug companies recommend monthly heartworm prevention? The reason is clearly identified  clearly in the study of Drs. Knight and Lok’s study on page 80 :

“…given what is presently known, continued adherence to a policy of superfluous chemoprophylaxis is disquieting because financial expediency for the veterinarian conflicts with clinical objectivity and client consent is predicated on unrealistic expectations. Clients mistakenly believe that they are purchasing additional protection for their pets, but in reality they are not. If the truth was known to them, few clients would agree to unnecessarily double their expense for heartworm prevention.”

In real language  and life translation most vets are too busy to question the recommendations that drug companies give them about heartworm prevention.  I strongly believe that the main  reason for over recommending heartworm prevention ( chemoprophylaxis ) is that drug companies can double or triple their revenues.

 

3. Safe alternative to heartworm preventive drugs

My dog  Skai and I travel to Hawaii approximately twice a year for 2  months and I had to face  the dilemma what  to do about  heartworm.   I  never felt totally comfortable about giving him any  drugs because in my mind, there is no such thing as a little bit of poison.

Luckily, advances  in heartworm testing offers DNA testing on the basis of PCR technology which allows me to test 3 times a year for any presence of heartworm.  This test has virtually no false negatives which is great news for your dog.

I can see that these tests are  a serious threat to the heft profits of  manufacturers of heartworm meds. They are simply not needed if you follow this formula  considering the duration of the heartworm seasons you can find out from the map  on page 79

 

Season Duration   Number of Tests Required
    (the last should be done at the end of HW Season)
Less than 4 months   1 test
4 – 8 months   2 tests
8 – 12 months   3 tests

 

 

Consider the facts above, in order to prevent heartworm and keep your dog safe, all you need to do is test your dog if you live in an affected area. If the results are positive (heartworm DNA is present) make sure that you consult your veterinarian before administering any heartworm meds. Heartworm preventive medication can be used only if adult heartworms are NOT present because using preventive drugs on adult heartworm can cause serious problems and  a different treatment protocol must be used.

Conclusion

I regret to say that similar to the vaccination scam,  monthly heartworm prevention is yet another dishonest marketing plot.   What I am confused about is why drug companies continuously try to trick us and frighten us instead making a living the honest way.  No matter what they are planning to try next, I believe that eventually they will have to become more honest in order to survive because it is much more difficult  to hide the truth in the age of world wide web.

Wishing you a happy, more informed heartworm season.

 

With gratitude,

 

Peter Dobias, dvm
 
This is a wonderful site to visit to get the latest information on research and health of dogs.  I just can’t say enough about Dr. Dobias and his love of dogs and their health.
 
White Oak Golden Retrievers

Infographic: The Benefits of Massage – Life Dog – Web 2012 – Life Dog

Infographic: The Benefits of Massage – Life Dog – Web 2012 – Life Dog.

Vaccines, Collagen and Joint Disease

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Vaccines, Collagen And Joint Disease

April 9, 2012 – Featured Articles7 comments

 
 

January 2011 Issue By Dana Scott

Most people have heard of collagen as an anti-aging cosmetic product.  Collagen is the elastic protein that holds skin together.  As we age, the amount and quality of collagen in our bodies starts to diminish and we can see this in our skin as it begins to wrinkle and sag.

Collagen is also found in abundance in the joints and connective tissue of the body. In fact, collagen makes up 70 to 90% of our muscles, tendons, ligaments and other joint supporting tissues. As happens in the skin, when collagen breaks down in the body, the joints become less stable, the muscles and connective tissue loosen and become more brittle, and disorders such as arthritis, degenerative disc disease, tendonitis and overuse injuries begin to occur.

The same thing happens in our dogs. They might not get the crow’s feet and turkey necks that we older humans sport, but they do suffer from age related joint and soft tissue pain due to collagen loss and degradation.  Sadly, many dogs suffer from these diseases at a very young age. Breeders and lovers of large breed dogs know all too well the heartache of canine hip and elbow dysplasia. Dog owners see patellar subluxations, cruciate tears and osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) in young dogs at an alarming rate and they pay the price with expensive surgery, therapy and supplements.

Why are dogs suffering from these diseases at such a young age? Many breeders and vets are quick to say that it is due to bad genetics – so good breeders screen their dogs for these diseases before breeding, to make sure the problems are not passed down to the offspring.

The problem is, this screening hasn’t really changed the incidence of most of these diseases.

Hip dysplasia was first diagnosed in dogs in 1935, although nobody seemed terribly interested at the time.  Over twenty years later, the number of dogs presenting with this disease prompted the Swed- ish Kennel Club to become one of the first to develop a program to reduce the incidence of hip dysplasia. They believed that if German Shepherd breeders took radiographs of their dogs and only bred the dogs that did not show evidence of hip dysplasia, they could eliminate hip dysplasia.  After ten years of selective breeding however, the incidence of moderate and severe cases of hip dysplasia didn’t change.  Dogs that did not show radiographic evidence of hip dysplasia were still producing puppies with the disease. In one study, over two thirds of dysplastic puppies were from normal parents.

This led researchers to conclude that hip dysplasia was a polygenic disease (residing in more than one gene), meaning that the severity of the disease could be influenced by environmental factors such as diet and lifestyle. However, affected puppies are born with normal hips – the dysplastic changes are not there at birth.

Over fifty years later, despite increased testing rates, the incidence of hip dysplasia is not going down in most breeds.  In fact, smaller breeds are now showing an increased susceptibility to this disease which historically was limited to larger breeds of dogs. Even in Germany, where the kennel club has very tight breeding restrictions, the incidence of hip dysplasia in German Shepherds is still 7%.

Hip dysplasia is not the only common joint disorder in dogs. Cranial cruciate tears are becoming endemic in dogs, as are luxating patellas and elbow dysplasia (two more disorders that breeders do clearances for).  In the midst of this, the vets point their fingers at both breeders and purebred dogs and the breeders point their fingers at the pet owners and at each other.  Surely somebody must be to blame?

A polygenic disease is one that takes the right combination of genetic susceptibility, environmental factors and dietary influences to occur. The genes are like a light switch: if a dog has a genetic susceptibility to hip dysplasia, the switch is in the ON position. Just because a dog has the gene for hip dysplasia however, does not mean he will be affected: the severity of the disease will be directly influenced by the dog’s diet and other environmental factors such as exercise level or body condition – or so the theory goes. Unfortunately, we don’t know which dogs possess and produce the genes that cause joint disease – but dog owners can change the environmental stressors.

To this point, vets and many breeders will pay lip service to things such as keeping puppies lean, not feeding them too much protein (a myth that is not proven), giving them supplements – all the usual drama.  Puppy buyers usually get this well rehearsed speech when they bring their new puppy in for his vaccination. Most vets actively look for large breed puppies to show signs of hip dysplasia and are ready to step in with surgery.  They blame the breeders and their purebred dogs for joint issues while, at the same time, they inject these healthy puppies with vaccines.

Is it any coincidence that even severe cases of hip dysplasia are not seen before eight weeks of age – the age at which most puppies are vaccinated?  Why is it that, once again, vets are recommending expensive hip surgeries and multiple, unnecessary vaccines, while remaining oblivious to what should be obvious?  Why is nobody blaming the vaccines when there are plenty of reasons to do so?

Vaccines and Joint Disorders

The Canine Health Concern’s 1997 study of 4,000 dogs showed a high number  of dogs developing mobility problems shortly after they were vaccinated. Immunologist Dr. Jean Dodds has also noted similar issues: “Beyond the immediate hypersensitivity (vaccine) reactions, other acute events tend to occur 24 to 72 hours afterward, or 7 to 45 days later in a delayed type immunological response. Even more delayed adverse effects include…canine distemper antibodies in joint diseases of dogs.”

Interesting. The distemper vaccine was introduced in 1950 and just a few years later, the breed clubs suddenly felt the need to start doing hip clearances on breeding stock. There is no cause and effect here but the temporal relationship is fairly noteworthy.

Vaccination has been implicated in cases of polyarthritis in dogs. Here is an interesting passage from the Veterinary Products Com- mittee (VPC) Working Group on Feline and Canine Vaccination.

“Occasional self-limiting cases of immune-based arthritis in dogs have been reported usually following primary vaccination, and recently, four young adult dogs of different breeds have been reported to develop an idiopathic polyarthritis three to15 days after multivalent vaccination. Immune-mediated  polyarthritis and systemic disease including amyloidosis has been reported in Akita dogs following modified live vaccination.   Hypertrophic  osteodystrophy (HOD), in some cases associated with juvenile cellulitis, has been reported following vaccination, mainly in Weimaraners, and it has been suggested that canine distemper virus may be involved. There is also some evidence that canine distemper virus (and possibly vaccines) may be involved in canine rheumatoid-like  arthritis through  the formation of immune complexes”.

Here is the predictable part: “…the immunological basis of such reactions is unclear, and it is possible that such apparent associations with vaccination may be due to coincident disease development, particularly in young animals”.

That sure would be a heck of a coincidence.  Catherine O’Driscoll sheds more light on the relationship.

“A paper appearing in the British Veterinary Journal states that dogs with rheumatoid  arthritis showed higher anti-heat shock protein antibody levels in their sera and synovial fluids compared to control dogs. There was a significant correlation between anti HSP65 and antibodies to canine distemper virus, and the paper discussed the relevance of the presence of canine distemper virus within the joints.  Since vaccines inject modified live distemper virus into the dog, this research should be of concern.  Shed attenuated live vaccine might also be considered in this regard. And it’s worth noting that the high antibody titers to distemper that we are so pleased with might also play a role in our dogs’ decreasing mobility. Rheumatoid arthritis is, of course an autoimmune condition in which there is inflammation of joints and progressive erosion of cartilage and bone, which reflects the autoantibodies to collagen found in the Purdue study.”

Autoantibodies to collagen? Vaccinated dogs developed autoantibodies to their own collagen and nobody was worried about that?

The Purdue Study

In 1999, a one of a kind study was performed that should have connected the dots between vaccination and joint disease (Hogenesch H, Azcona-Olivera J, Scott-Montcrieff C, Snyder PW, Glickman LT. Vaccine-induced autoimmunity in the dog. Adv Med Vet 1999;41:733-747). In this study, puppies were immunized with the rabies vaccine and the usual cocktail of core and non-core vaccines. The authors concluded that the vaccinated but not the unvaccinated puppies developed autoantibodies to their own collagen.  The authors noted and reproduced similar findings in a follow-up study in dogs that were given just the rabies vaccine and just the multivalent vaccine.

The vaccinated dogs in this study were literally destroying their own collagen (as well as their own DNA and other important substances), and nobody thought “aha, maybe this is why our dogs are being hit so hard with joint disease and we can’t breed it out of them.” Instead, the researchers discontinued the study when the puppies were 22 weeks of age and, over a decade later, nobody has viewed these results as a serious threat to canine (or human) health.

Why is it that vets and researchers can claim purebred dogs and genetics are to blame for these joint disorders when this shining beacon is aimed squarely on vaccination, especially the distemper shot?

Collagen  and Joint Disease

In a 1989 study, Bari et al found autoimmunity to collagen in 72.4% of dogs with rheumatoid arthritis, 88% of dogs with infective arthritis and 52% of dogs with osteoarthritis.  Dogs with cruciate disease also showed significantly increased levels of autoantibodies.  They also had higher levels of anti-collagen antibodies in the synovial fluid (the fluid that surrounds  joints).  They concluded that anti-collagen complexes were present in all joint disorders.

The presence of these anti-collagen antibodies, just like those noted in the vaccinated dogs in the Purdue study, can actually predict cruciate tears.  In dogs with cruciate tears in one leg, studies show elevated anti-collagen antibodies in the other leg which predicted future tears.  When multiple joints were tested, higher levels of autoantibodies were found in stifle joints that were eventually torn than in other joints of the body (DeBruin et al, 2007). These autoantibodies have also been found in the joints of dogs suffering from arthritis that is not secondary to cruciate tears (Niebauer et al, 1987).

Duke  University Medical Center  researchers  led by Kyle Allen found that collagen deficient mice prematurely developed common and chronic musculoskeletal disorders while the wild-type mice did not.  “We observed a pattern of behavioral changes in the collagen deficient mice that suggests a relationship to (osteoarthritis and de- generative disc disease),” said Allen, who noted the collagen deficient mice also had elevated levels of knee and intervertebral disc structural changes.

Collagen  and Joint Integrity

Collagen is concentrated mostly in weight supporting tissues, basically cartilage and bones. Collagen is also concentrated in high percentages in the parts of the body transmitting strength, such as tendons. Collagen not only protects joint cartilage, it is also what protects tendons and ligaments against tears.

The elastic property of collagen gives ligaments a tiny bit of stretch so that if the joint that ligament supports is stressed, the ligament can withhold the tension without tearing. Just as bridges and high rise buildings need a tiny bit of give in them to weather high winds and earthquakes, ligaments need the elastic properties of collagen to bear shearing forces within the joints.

Collagen is also important for the integrity of joint surfaces. There is a thin layer of tissue surrounding the cartilage on the surface of joints called the pericellular matrix (PCM). Together with collagen and other cartilage cells, the PCM forms a barrier between the cells and the rest of the cartilage tissue.  When collagen is disrupted in joints, the changes in mechanical forces on the cells can lead to degenerative changes.

Leonidas Alexopoulos studied the relationship  between collagen and osteoarthritis at Duke University and presented the results at the 51th annual scientific meeting of the Orthopedic Research Society in Washington, DC. Alexopoulos explains: ““When we analyzed the PCM of mice unable to produce type VI collagen, we found that the chondrons (joint surface structures) in these mice were much softer and the joints did not respond well to mechanical pressures. The joint looked as if osteoarthritis had developed.”

In May, 1997, a paper was presented in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association by Jens Sejer Madsen, Ph.D., D.V.M. from the Small Animal Hospital, Department  of Clinical Studies, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg C, Denmark.  This study shows how collagen can be related to hip dysplasia.

“Mechanical strength of the joint capsule is related to its collagen content and composition. In children with congenital hip joint dislocation, the collagen composition of the joint capsule has been shown to be abnormal. Thus, it is reasonable to hypothesize that laxity of the hip joint in dogs may be related to the collagen composition of the capsule…results of the study support the hypothesis that a change in collagen composition may contribute to hip joint laxity in dogs with a predisposition to CHD.”

The vets and breeders are right in that hip dysplasia and other joint disorders are caused by a variety of environmental and nutritional factors.  Genetics probably do play a role, although it could have something to do with the cumulative damage the puppies’ parents and grandparents suffer through repeated vaccination, highly processed diets, antibiotics and toxins. On top of that, the Purdue study showed that vaccinated dogs develop autoantibodies to their own DNA; perhaps vaccinated breeding dogs are passing along damaged DNA and that is a part of the picture.

Meanwhile, the vets and researchers repeatedly state there is no cause and effect relationship and that further studies will have to be done before vaccines can be implicated in joint disease. While we wait for those magical studies, vets continue to vaccinate every three years, or even more frequently, with vaccines that were shown to last at least seven years over thirty years ago.

In the case of distemper, one of the vaccines repeatedly vindicated in joint disease, puppies develop titers within hours of their first distemper vaccination. In his study at the University of Wisconsin- Madison, Dr. Ronald Schultz vaccinated puppies with one dose of distemper vaccine just four hours prior to being placed in a room with distemper-infected dogs. All of the puppies were protected against distemper in this challenge study.

This bears repeating. Dr. Ronald Schultz, the leading canine immunologist, publishes a study in which every single puppy is protected within hours of the very first vaccination. Thirty years prior to this, he determined that core vaccines (including distemper) last at least seven years, and most likely for the life of the dog.  So it should be pretty obvious that it only takes one distemper vaccine to protect a puppy from distemper for life. Why then does the average dog get vaccinated for distemper at 8 weeks, 12 weeks, 16 weeks, one year, four years, seven years, ten years – and if he is lucky enough to have lived through this unnecessary and dangerous onslaught – thirteen and sixteen years of age? Nine shots of the same virus that is shown to be permanently effective within hours of the very first vaccine is considered a minimal vaccine schedule by most veterinarians – many other dogs receive 15 or more shots of distemper!  It is no wonder that joint disease is on the rise in dogs, especially in the most aggressively vaccinated subset: purebred dogs.

Clearly, more research needs to be done in this area but somebody should at least pay attention to the growing list of unwanted and adverse effects caused by vaccines. There is a growing list of joint and collagen related changes that occur after vaccination and they are implicated in joint disease which has become a significant problem in today’s dog population.  I’m not saying stop vaccination for distemper altogether (although that is a viable option), but at the very least, stop the madness of unnecessarily vaccinating dogs for distemper over, and over, and over, and over again. Isn’t there enough research to make vets just a little bit concerned about potential damage from the eight or more distemper vaccines that go into dogs?

It seems that in-depth research and analysis are not all that necessary when it comes to giving more vaccines but when it comes to giving less, research is suddenly put on the hot seat and common sense goes out the window. What will it take before vets start taking this research seriously and stop vaccinating dogs unnecessarily?

Article published by Dogs Naturally Magizine.com in the January 2011 issue by Dana Scott

White Oak Golden Retrievers

www.whiteoakgoldenretrievers.com

Dog Food Reviews

The Dog Food Advisor\’s unbiased dog food reviews and dog food ratings searchable by brand or star rating. Find the best dry, canned or raw food for your dog.

via Dog Food Reviews.

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Dog Food: Ten Scary Truths

Dog Food:  Ten Scary Truths

Written by Jan Rasmusen on December 13, 2010. Posted in Nutrition And Diet 9 Comments

 
 
dog bowlBy:  Jan Rasmusen

40% of dogs are obese. 46% of dogs and 39% of cats now die of cancer.  Heart, kidney and liver disease are epidemic. Like people, dogs are what  they eat. Save your dog a lot of suffering, and save yourself a fortune  in vet bills, by learning the truth about your dog’s diet. Here are 10 important things you may not know about what your dog is eating:

1)      Commercial dog food is “fast food.

Heavily-processed fast foods (burgers, fries, tacos, etc.) as a big  diet component can cause major health problems in people. How can fast  foods be good for dogs? Only dog food manufacturers think this nonsense  makes sense. Dogs and people share roughly 75% the same genetic makeup,  and we have similar nutritional needs. What we’re doing to our own  health with processed foods, we’re also doing to our dogs. And it’s  happening faster.

2)      People food is good for dogs.

Despite what you’ve heard from friends, vets and pet food manufacturers, wholesome ”people food” is good for dogs.  People food is only bad for dog food makers. The same fresh, nutritious foods people eat can offer your dog the  nutrition he needs and save you a mountain of vet bills.  It just takes a  little education to learn the small differences between human and  canine nutritional needs. (Hint: no onions, grapes or raisins. Rinse off  rich spices and sauces. Go easy on carbs and avoid wheat and corn.)

3)      Don’t presume the food your vet sells is a superior product.

Veterinarians, like medical doctors, learn relatively little about  nutrition in school. Much of what they do learn comes directly from pet  food company vets, sales reps, articles, studies, and seminars. If  your vet hasn’t studied and experimented on his or her own with raw or  homemade diets, it’s unlikely that he or she  knows bad food from good,  and may be acting on outdated information or superstition. And if vets  profit from selling one brand, and not another, they have a conflict of  interest that may influence their opinions. (Some may even be prohibited  by a manufacturer from selling more than one brand.)

4)      The quality of processed commercial foods is suspect.

Dog food may legally contain “4-D” meat: meat from dead, dying,  diseased and disabled animals. Add a little road kill, mill floor  sweepings labeled as grain, and corn contaminated with high levels of  pesticide (yes, really) and you have a recipe for ill health. The  cheaper the food, the cheaper the ingredients, the worse the nutrition. Read the labels!

5)      Kibble does not clean teeth.

Almost all dogs age three and over have dental diseases. Most of  these dogs eat kibble. That should tell you something.  Although a small  study once suggested that kibble might clean teeth better than canned food, better doesn’t mean effectively. Hoping to avoid brushing our dog’s teeth, we too willingly grasp at  kibble’s unsubstantiated health benefits. But pretending that kibble or  hard treats will keep teeth clean will only lead to huge vet bills, lost  teeth and much canine suffering.

6) “Complete and balanced” does not mean “optimum.”

“Complete and balanced” means that a food meets minimal theoretical health requirements for the average dog.  Food boasting that it  conducted Feeding Trials often just test only the lead product in a line  of foods.  Trials, too, are for only a small number of dogs for a short  period of time. Over time, nutrient and enzyme deficiencies are  inevitable. Of course, complete and balanced is better than not complete and balanced, but again, better does not mean good.

7)      Feeding the same food day after day limits nutrition.

Imagine eating corn, rancid fat and chicken wings (without meat)  every meal of your life, with the same mix of cheap vitamins and  minerals added. Nutritionists urge people to eat a variety of foods,  both for improved nutrition and also to prevent allergies. Dogs need  variety, too. But variety can cause gastrointestinal upset in dogs,  right?  In the short run, yes. Nutritionally-deprived animals have sick  guts. In fact, intestinal upset when switching foods is a sign your dog needs more variety. Once good nutrition has healed a dog’s digestive system,  the dog can eat different foods every meal — just as people do. Just  switch foods gradually over several weeks while your dog’s gut heals.

8)      Kibble is not better than canned.

Whereas canned food is preserved by the process of canning, most  kibble is preserved artificially. (Ever contemplate how much  preservative must be required to retard spoilage of food left out all  day?) Kibble begins as a dry cooked meal whereas canned food is canned  fresh.  Kibble is exposed to more heat than canned  (destroying nutrients). Worse yet, kibble is linked to kidney and  bladder problems in cats, and to bloat, a deadly problem especially for  large, broad-chested dogs. It’s also dehydrating. Of course, canned  isn’t perfect either. Fresh is best, raw or cooked. Next best is frozen  prepared food and then dehydrated and freeze dried foods, all available  at better pet stores.

9)      Some common foods can be hazardous to canine health.

Cooked bones and rawhide chews can cause major health problems  requiring emergency surgery. Wheat-based treats can bring on allergies.  Onions, grapes, raisins, chocolate, the article sweetener Xylitol and  other common foods can be toxic for dogs and must be avoided.

10)   Corn kills.

Most kibble is loaded with corn, a cheap filler. Unfortunately, the  corn isn’t the luscious kind you and I eat. It’s feed corn (like cattle  eat), or cheap feed corn remnants. Even corn meal dust counts  as corn. The corn may even have been condemned for human consumption,  there being no upper level of pesticide contamination for pet foods. If  that weren’t bad enough, corn (which gives us both high fructose corn  syrup and corn oil) is fattening. Any wonder so many dogs are obese and  suffer from diabetes?

*****

Improving your dog’s diet can add years to your dog’s life and save  you a fortune. It doesn’t require a lot of work or expense. It just  requires a little knowledge and the desire to give your dog the healthy  body he or she deserves. Check out the two chapters in my book, Scared Poopless: The Straight Scoop on Dog Care. (Read an excerpt about dog food myths.) And check out Dog and Cat Food Labels: Marketing Tricks That Cost You Money and Dog Food: What to Feed and Why.

Feed Your Dog Raw Eggs

 

Feeding Your Dog Raw Eggs – Good Or Bad?

Written by Dogs Naturally Magazine on March 26, 2012. Posted in Nutrition And Diet 22 Comments

 
 

There are a lot of myths and misconceptions about raw feeding and it seems the poor egg is often dragged through the mud as a dangerous food for dogs. Opponents of eggs claim that they are too high in cholesterol, they pose a risk of salmonella and that they cause a biotin deficiency. To that, we say nonsense! Eggs are not only a cheap and safe source of raw food for your dog, they are one of the most complete and nutritious meals you can choose!

Here are the facts you need to know about eggs.

Eggs are a complete food source – Eggs are an important source of nutrition for not only many predators, but for the chick living inside it.  Inside the egg are all the nutrients necessary to grow a new chicken.  Eggs are also one of the most complete sources of amino acids, the building blocks of protein.  Eggs are a good source of:

Vitamin A Riboflavin Folate Vitamin B12 Iron Selenium Fatty Acids

Egg whites contain enzyme inhibitors – One of the reasons pet owners are warned off eggs is that the whites contain enzyme inhibitors which can interfere with digestion, especially in very young and old animals.  This is true, but it only means that eggs should not be the mainstay of the diet.  It is perfectly safe to feed several eggs a week to the average dog.  If you don’t see evidence of digestive upset when feeding eggs to dogs, then he should have no trouble if eggs are a regular part of his diet.  Cooking the egg white could solve this problem but much of the nutrition would be lost so it is best to feed it raw.

Egg whites cause Biotin deficiency – Egg whites contain avidin, a Biotin (one of the B vitamins) inhibitor.  Biotin is one of the B vitamins and is important for cellular growth, fatty acid metabolism and good skin and coat.  Biotin deficiencies are quite rare and it would take an extraordinary amount of eggs to create a deficiency.  Moreover, egg yolks are very high in biotin, so as long as you feed the entire egg, there are few worries.  There are other sources of biotin in the diet as well.  Liver is a particularly good source.  Once again, cooking the egg white will eliminate the risk but your dog will lose much of the nutritional value.  If feeding your dog eggs on a regular basis, simply make sure he gets the whole egg, not just the white.

Eggs contain salmonella – Dogs are well equipped to handle the bacteria in raw foods.  The health of the hen is also important, so it is best to choose eggs from organic, free-range chickens.  Proper storage and keeping the eggs cool will also go a long way toward keeping the harmful bacteria at a manageable level.

Don’t forget the shells – If eggs are fed with the shell on, they are a nearly complete food source for dogs.  The shells can also be valuable for dogs who have difficulty eating bones.  Simply dry the shells out and grind them in a clean coffee grinder until they are powdered and sprinkle the powder on your dog’s food.  It’s important to remember that many eggs are sprayed with a chemical to make them look shiny, so it is best to get your eggs from a local organic farmer.

Eggs are cheap, easily obtained and an outstanding source of nutrition for your dog.  The overall concensus with raw feeders is that the health benefits of eggs certainly outweigh the risks – and feeding eggs whole, the way nature intended, goes a long ways to counteract harmful imbalances.  Try feeding your dogs a few eggs a week and he will you’ll see better health, inside and out.

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Ten Vaccine Myths

Ten Vaccine Myths

Written by Catherine O’Driscoll on June 11, 2011. Posted in Vaccine Articles and News 20 Comments

 
 

Myth No. 1

Vaccines protect our dogs against disease, helping to ensure they live long, healthy, happy lives.

Wrong!

Vaccines only sometimes protect our dogs against disease (if at all).  Scientific studies into human vaccines have shown that just as many  vaccinated people, and sometimes more vaccinated people, contract  diseases as do unvaccinated people.

A study conducted by Canine Health Concern during 1997, involving 2,700  dogs, showed that 68.2% of dogs in the survey with parvovirus contracted  it within three months of being vaccinated. Similarly, 55.6% of dogs  with distemper contracted it within three months of vaccination; 63.6%  contracted hepatitis within three months of vaccination; 50% contracted  parainfluenza within three months of vaccination; and every single dog  with leptospirosis contracted it within that three month timeframe.

So vaccines represent – at best – only a 50/50 chance of protection. But  if you doubt the validity of the CHC survey, ask around. It won’t take  long to find people whose dogs contracted these diseases shortly after  being vaccinated. In a parvo vaccine trial conducted by Dr Ronald D  Schultz, head of pathobiology at Wisconsin University, three out of six  parvo vaccine brands totally failed to give protection; two gave only  partial protection; and only one was shown to be effective.

Myth No. 2

Vaccines have eradicated epidemics.

Wrong!

Vaccine manufacturers like to claim this. But research shows that  vaccines are generally introduced after the disease has died out:  diseases die out after 67% of a population has been exposed to it. The  smallpox vaccine is often quoted as having eradicated smallpox. In fact,  scientists stopped using it when they finally admitted that it was  causing too many side-effects.

Only then did the disease die out.

There are strong arguments to suggest that vaccines keep diseases in the  eco-system. For example, the only cause of polio in the USA today is  the vaccine itself. (You can get polio if you change the nappy of a baby  who has recently been vaccinated against polio.) Vaccines also shed  into the environment, so a vaccinated or unvaccinated dog or cat can  contract a disease from the urine and faeces of a vaccinated dog or cat.

Myth No. 3

Vaccines are extremely safe.

Wrong!

No-one can legitimately claim that vaccines are safe – because no-one  has conducted the necessary research to make that claim. There are no  long-term studies to show the long-term effects of vaccines on humans,  let alone dogs.

Myth No. 4

Only a tiny minority of genetically-susceptible dogs will suffer adverse reactions to vaccines.

Wrong!

Whilst some dogs will have genetic weaknesses that make vaccines more  dangerous to them, there are many other factors which can put your dog  at risk.

Vaccine manufacturers warn, in their data sheets, that the following  factors can render vaccines harmful (they use the phrase,  “immunocompetence may be compromised” ):

1. if the dog is genetically defective 2. if there is something wrong with the dog’s diet 3. if the dog was unhealthy when vaccinated 4. if the dog is stressed at time of injection 5. if the dog’s immune system is incompetent 6. if the dog is exposed to a virus shortly after vaccination 7. if the dog is taking immune suppressant drugs such as steroids 8. if the vet stores and handles the vaccine inappropriately 9. if the dog is incubating disease at the time of vaccination

And if no-one is recording the adverse effects of vaccines effectively,  then how can anyone say only a ‘tiny minority’ have adverse reactions?  In the UK, vets are asked (not compelled) to report adverse reactions if  they suspect an adverse vaccine reaction. If a dog falls down having an  epileptic fit within half an hour, ten days, or a month of vaccination,  the vet very often fails to suspect a link – even though vaccines are  known to cause epilepsy, and the human Vaccine Damage Compensation Unit  has paid up to £30,000 to parents whose children were made epileptic by  vaccines. Even if the vet does suspect a link, there is no law to make  him report the suspected reaction. Many vets are too busy to complete  the necessary paperwork. The same applies to other diseases which many  scientists contend are vaccine-related – such as skin disease,  arthritis, cancer, encephalitis, etc.

Myth No. 5

“I am a vet, and I have only seen one vaccine reaction in 20 years’ of practice.”

Wrong!

You only think you have seen one vaccine reaction in twenty years of  practice! Vets have been trained to look for an immediate reaction –  where the dog is allergic to the vaccine (this allergy is the basis for  the genetic link claim). In the event of an allergic reaction –  sometimes called anaphylaxis or a hypersensitivity reaction – the vet is  advised to inject adrenalin into the animal to save his life.

Because vaccine components can remain in the system for long periods of  time, and because most of these disease take time to show themselves,  causal link is rarely established. Unless, that is, scientists take the  time (despite fears that their funding might be withdrawn by the  pharmaceutical industry) to study the facts.

Research papers published by eminent scientists show that the following diseases can be caused by vaccines:

Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia

A dreadful disease that usually kills a dog within days. Progress of the  disease closely resembles the last stages of AIDS. Cancer – Dr Denis W  Macey was reported in an American veterinary paper as saying that up to  22,000 cats develop cancer at the site of vaccination every year in the  USA.

The Salk Polio Vaccine

Administered to thousands of people in the 1950s and ’60s was  contaminated with a Simian (monkey) retrovirus (called SV40) that has  been found at human cancer sites. An Avian (bird) retrovirus has also  been found at human cancer sites, suspected to have come from the MMR  vaccine. Monkey kidneys, chick embryos, dog brains and kidney, and cat  brains and kidneys are all commonly used as vaccine culture media. If  the animal used as a culture medium for vaccines carries a retrovirus  and this is undetected and left in the vaccine, the vaccine can  permanently alter the genes of the animal or human receiving the  vaccine.

Genetic defects

The significance of vaccines’ gene altering potential is alarming. For  example, SV40 has been found at cancer sites belonging to the children  of people who received the SV40-contaminated Salk Polio vaccine. SV40  switches off the part of the DNA that protects from cancer, and this  defect can be inherited.

Although the British government was informed that the polio vaccine was  contaminated at the time, they took the decision to use it anyway.  Records have now been destroyed (to protect the guilty?). Once it was  decided it was too risky to continue using the contaminated vaccine on  the UK population, it was sold overseas to unsuspecting ‘foreigners’.

So God help your dog. Thyroid disease is inheritable; and this can be  caused by vaccines. Once a dog has underlying thyroid disease, he or she  only needs a trigger – from a vaccine, an environmental pollutant, from  stress, or from dietary inadequacies – to develop full-blown autoimmune  diseases. Thyroid disease can often be undetected. For example,  behavioural problems, hormonal imbalances, nymphomania, and coat loss  can by symptoms of thyroid disease, but are often treated at face value  without establishing the underlying cause.

Leukaemia

Dr Jean Dodds, one of the world’s foremost experts in canine vaccine  reactions, says: “Recent vaccinations with single or combination  modified live virus (MLV) vaccines are increasingly recognised  contributors to immune-mediated blood diseases, bone marrow failure, and  organ dysfunction.”

Dr Dodds lists leukaemia, thyroid disease, Addison’s disease, diabetes,  and lymphoma as diseases that can be triggered by vaccines.

Parvovirus

Yes, parvovirus was created by vaccines. This disease didn’t exist prior  to the 1970s. In fact, scientists tell us it was created by vaccine  manufacturers who cultured the distemper vaccine on cat kidneys that  were infected with feline enteritis. This cat-enteritis-diseased  distemper vaccine was then injected into dogs around the world, and  parvovirus reared its ugly head around the world at the same time.  Similarly, human AIDS is thought by some scientists to be a  vaccine-induced plague. HIV (humans), FIV (cats), and SIV (monkeys) are  closely related viruses. Two separate scientific papers link the  emergence of HIV in humans with the use of SIV-infected polio vaccines  (cultured on monkey kidneys) on male homosexuals in New York, and  innocent citizens of the Belgian Congo.

Arthritis

If there is a history of arthritis, epilepsy or allergies in a human  family, doctors will often refrain from vaccinating a child. Arthritis  is an inflammatory (hypersensitivity/allergy) disease. Vaccines contain  various components, including serum (often bovine serum posing a BSE  type threat), formaldehyde, aluminium, and mercury. Is it any wonder  that an animal might become hypersensitive or inflamed after having  these poisons injected into hm? According to one vaccine manufacturer,  vaccines that are cultured on animal tissue can contain ‘extraneous  proteins’ that can cause autoimmune diseases. Arthritis is an autoimmune  disease, and it was found in the CHC survey to manifest in clusters  nine months after vaccination. Animals with a genetic pre-disposition to  allergies (ie ‘people’ from families with a history of irritable bowel  syndrome/Crohns disease/enteritis, asthma, hay fever, eczema, and so  on), can become more allergic, or become highly sensitised, when you  inject foreign proteins (serums and organ tissue) into them. Veterinary  manuals talk openly about serum reactions.

Allergies

There are many, many research papers showing a link between allergies and vaccines. In 1983, for example, Frick and Brooks published a paper to show that  inhalant allergies (such as atopic dermatitis) have developed in dogs  when vaccinated with distemper, hepatitis and leptospirosis vaccines  just prior to, but not after, exposure to pollen extracts. ‘Atopic’  means an inherited pre-disposition to produce excess amounts of IgE  antibodies in response to antigens (the things the animal is allergic to  such as pollen, flea bites, dust mites, etc.). As a result the allergic  individuals suffer chronically irritating skin inflammations. Other  organs may exhibit signs of hypersensitivity causing, for example,  conjunctivitis or rhinitis. Homoeopathic vets treat a large proportion  of skin problems as ‘vaccinosis’ (a morbid reaction to vaccines).

Epilepsy

As stated earlier, it is scientifically recognised that vaccines can  cause epilepsy in humans. Dr Hans Selye published a famous paper in  ‘Nature’ in 1936 which explained how an organism will react to a massive  challenge (such as a vaccine). Every system of the body springs into  action, and a hormone called DOC can be released. This hormone can cause  brain lesions and destruction of large parts of the brain. Epilepsy is a  neurological (brain) condition. In addition, this brain damage can lead  to behavioural problems. Harris L Coulter has published a very  convincing argument to suggest that unprovoked aggression in humans has  its base in encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) caused by vaccines.

Myth No. 6

Vaccine manufacturers have to undergo stringent procedures and tests to ensure safety.

Wrong!

OK, partly true . . . vaccine manufacturers have to go through safety  procedures and tests, but to claim that these tests are stringent is  highly subjective. How, then, did SV40 get through; how did the avian  virus get into the MMR vaccine; how did parvovirus slip through the net;  and how did AIDS suddenly arrive from nowhere? In actual fact, no-one  is permitted (in the UK at least) to test the viral component of a  veterinary vaccine except a vaccine manufacturer. They are the only ones  with a license to do it. This means that if you suspect a vaccine  killed your puppy, you have to take the vaccine company’s word for it if  they say it didn’t.

There’s no-one to go to if you want an independent check.

Myth No. 7

It’s better to risk a vaccine reaction than subject my dog to these deadly killer diseases.

Wrong!

Firstly, very few of the classic canine diseases are deadly.

Parvovirus is only generally deadly to puppies and, as maternal antibody  can be present for as many as 22 weeks, and as maternal antibody  cancels out the vaccine, vaccinated puppies are unlikely to be protected  from parvovirus. Adult dogs rarely die from parvovirus. Distemper kills only half of affected dogs. Indeed, dogs most  susceptible to disease are those who are fed poor quality processed  foods (and don’t imagine that price equals quality). A dog fed a natural  diet, containing ‘real’ food, is most able to combat any viral  challenges. Also, please be aware that there is an alternative to a  highly risky vaccine – this is discussed later. Clinical signs of  hepatitis and parainfluenza range from mild and invisible to death (the  flu rarely kills; hepatitis can be caused by a range of factors,  including poor diet, and the vaccine doesn’t protect against all of the  other dangers). Secondly, no-one knows how common these diseases are.  No-one records their existence.

Leptospirosis, for example, is extremely rare (apart from which,  leptospirosis is a range of over a hundred bacterins; the chances of the  strain in the needle matching the strain in the field are remote; and  the vaccine only confers protection for between three and six months,  leaving vaccinated dogs ‘unprotected’ for up to nine months anyway).  Vaccines have also been known to cause the diseases they were designed  to prevent. This happens when a vaccine is injected into an animal with a  suppressed immune system (caused by genetic factors, poor diet, stress,  existing illness, etc.); or when the vaccine manufacturer fails to  render the viral component of the vaccine harmless in the lab. In the  latter instance, the vaccine is withdrawn after it has killed ‘more dogs  than normally expected’ (in the words of one vaccine manufacturer as it  withdrew its vaccine).

Canine Health Concern’s vaccine survey indicated that at least one in  every hundred dogs is damaged by vaccines. As no-one has any statistics  to suggest otherwise, it should be up to vets and vaccine manufacturers  to prove vaccines are safe – and not the other way round. We whose dogs  have died or suffered chronic debilitating diseases shouldn’t have to  take their word for it when the vaccine manufacturers deny  responsibility. Our concerns should be taken seriously, and not  strenuously denied in the face of overwhelming evidence.

Myth No. 8

The homoeopathic vaccine alternative is unproven.

Wrong!

Existing research and experience shows that the homoeopathic nosode is  as protective – but probably more protective – than vaccines. Whereas  the medical and veterinary ‘professions’ receive huge sums of money from  international multi-billion dollar pharmaceutical conglomerates, please  note that homoeopaths do not. Rather, vets who trust the less expensive  homoeopathic alternative suffer serious financial loss by refusing to  sell highly lucrative annual boosters. A growing number of dog lovers  are beginning to choose the homoeopathic alternative to vaccines. Some  have been using the nosode for up to twenty years, and claim that they  have never had a problem.

Myth No. 9

You should vaccinate your dog every year.

Wrong!

If you hear nothing else, if you can accept nothing else, please know  that annual vaccination is not necessary. Please do not subject your  dogs to the vaccine risk year after year until they drop.

Once immunity to a virus exists, it persists for the lifetime of the  host. In the case of leptospirosis (a bacterial disease), I have already  explained that the vaccine is virtually useless and therefore not worth  the risk.

One American veterinary vaccine manufacturer has made a public  announcement, saying that it no longer recommends annual vaccination.  Several American veterinary colleges have announced the same, in  reaction to consumer pressure and fears over adverse reactions.

One veterinary college said that annual vaccination has no scientific  basis, and we might as well have chosen ‘every full moon’ to stick the  needle in. And please be aware that a vaccine administered to a puppy,  when his immune system is immature, is probably the most harmful jab of  all, capable of wreaking havoc – havoc that you might not be able to  detect immediately.

Myth No. 10

My doctor/vet knows best.

Wrong!

Doctors and vets are trained in a very specific healing discipline. They  know a little about pharmaceuticals, and some of them know about  surgery.

But they rely upon the pharmaceutical industry to tell them which drugs  to use in which circumstances. When a conventionally trained scientist  tells you that homeopathy doesn’t work, you may as well ask your  butcher whether electricity works – the fact is, conventional vets  rarely have any knowledge of homeopathy to base their opinions on.  Homeopaths do not claim to be able to reverse all vaccine damage, and  conventional vets – not even recognizing vaccine damage – have little  success.

Once you’ve administered the needle, you can never change your mind. Please STUDY THE FACTS, don’t live to regret it.

Lyme Disease Vaccine for Dogs

 LYME–Vaccinate or Not?


PERMISSION GRANTED TO CROSS-POST THIS MESSAGE.
In response to questions about Lyme disease in dogs and the Lyme vaccine, I would like to share the advice that Dr. Ronald Schultz, Chair of Pathobiological Sciences at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine gave me for my 2 dogs, who both receive(d) (one died in July from a mast cell tumor which developed at a rabies vaccination site) 100+ tick bites a summer.
I was concerned after having contracted Lyme twice myself; however, none of the dogs we have had over 30 years were ever vaccinated against Lyme or ever contracted the disease. After getting it myself, I was reconsidering. Dr. Schultz advised me that there was far more risk associated with the Lyme vaccine than there was with antibiotics to treat the disease if one or both dogs contracted Lyme.
He further explained that if they tested positive for Lyme, but displayed no symptoms, then not to treat them with antibiotics because it indicated that they had been exposed to the disease, but hadn’t contracted the disease. However, he said, that if they tested positive for Lyme and had symptoms (lameness, fever, lethargy, etc..), then start treatment. Dr. Schultz elaborated by telling me that in vaccinology, immunology, the point is not to prevent infection, it is to prevent disease. In fact, low-grade infections are introduced to elicit immune responses, which is how vaccination works, by introducing an attenuated (weakened) antigen into the animal’s system.
Further, he said that a positive Lyme test in an ASYMPTOMATIC dog merely reflects the fact that the dog has been exposed; positive Lyme test in a dog with SYMPTOMS indicates that the animal has contracted the disease and needs treatment.
Based on his advice, I have chosen to not vaccinate my dog(s) against Lyme. Below are links to a few articles on the subject which may help you in deciding whether or not to vaccinate your dog against Lyme.
Lyme is a “killed” vaccine and is associated with clinically significant adverse reactions. According to the 2003 AAHA Guidelines (Page 16), “…killed vaccines are much more likely to cause hypersensitivity reactions (e.g., immune-mediated disease).” Further, the AAHA task force reports on Page 18 that, “Bacterial vaccines, especially killed whole organism products …..are much more likely to cause adverse reactions than subunit or live bacterial vaccines or MLV vaccines, especially if given topically. Several killed bacterial products are used as immunomodulators/adjuvants. Thus, their presence in a combination vaccine product may enhance or suppress the immune response or may cause an undesired response (e.g., IgE hypersensitivity or a class of antibody that is not protective).”
Dr. Alice Wolf, Professor of Small Animal Internal Medicine at Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine, stated in an address Vaccines of the Present and Future WSAVA 2001 – Vaccines of the Present and Future at the 2001 World Small Animal Veterinary Association World Congress that Lyme vaccines : “are only partially effective and may cause serious immune-mediated consequences in some dogs that are as serious or more serious than the disease itself…..The most reactive vaccines for dogs include leptospirosis bacterin and Borrelia [Lyme]vaccine .”.
Canine Lyme, What’s New? Vet Tech: Canine Lyme: What’s New?
No Lyme Vaccine for Charlie Nancy Freedman Smith, Maine Today Error
It is not a scientifically based recommendation to suggest that all dogs in Maine should be vaccinated with Lyme Vaccine. There may be select areas in the state, “hot spots” where infection is very high and vaccination would be indicated, but dogs in most parts of the state would probably not receive benefit and may actually be at risk of adverse reactions if a large scale vaccination program was initiated. Wisconsin has a much higher risk of Lyme than Maine, however at our Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (VMTH) we have used almost no Lyme vaccine since it was first USDA approved in the early 1990’s. What we have found is infection (not disease), in much of Wisconsin, is low (<10% infection). As you know, infection does not mean disease. About 3 to 4% of infected dogs develop disease. In contrast, in Western and Northwestern parts of Wisconsin infection occurs in 60 to 90% of all dogs. In those areas, vaccination is of benefit in reducing clinical disease. …….. Also, vaccinated dogs can develop disease as efficacy of the product is about 60 to 70% in preventing disease, thus antibiotics must be used in vaccinated dogs developing disease, just like it must be used in non-vaccinated diseased dogs. Therefore, in general areas with a low infection rate <10>50%) then the vaccine will be very useful. Thus, I believe it is irresponsible to suggest that all dogs in Maine should be vaccinated . Veterinarians should know, based on diagnoses in their clinic and other clinics in the area (town), how common the disease would be and they should base their judgment to vaccinate on risk, not on a statement that all dogs in Maine need Lyme vaccine!
R.D. Schultz
_______________________________ Ronald D. Schultz, Professor and Chair
Department of Pathobiological Sciences School of Veterinary Medicine
University of Wisconsin-Madison 2015 Linden Drive West Madison, WI 53706″
 
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